Points, Miles & Life

Travel adventures on this earthly pilgrimage

Category: Road Trips (page 2 of 3)

Are one night trips with kids worth it?

Single-night getaways might not seem worth the trouble to many people. While I do much prefer a stay of about three nights, such as the New Year’s getaway I spent with our older kids in Napa (SEE: Vino Bello Resort Napa Review), we have also taken a few single-night trips. This started with last year’s New Year’s night away in Calistoga (SEE: Celebrating New Year’s 2018). A second was our night in the Bay Area, where we used up my final Fairmont free night certificate last February.

Work kept interfering with my plans, and I had to bump our stay at the Claremont Hotel and Spa back twice. I began to think that we were going to run out of time and the free night certificate was going to expire on me.

Eventually, I nailed down a weekend that would work and confirmed that work would not be sending me anywhere (although this wasn’t ever a 100% guarantee…one trip had me booking a flight less than 24 hours from departure). We would make the trek to the Bay to enjoy the Claremont for one night (SEE: Claremont Hotel Berkeley Review).

Is it worth driving to the Bay for one night with two kids?

If you’re not familiar with where we live, the San Francisco Bay Area is a solid 5 hours from home. It is a drive I have made routinely, generally for work, although I have opted for Sacramento more often these days (SEE: 5 Reasons Why Sacramento is my Favorite Northern California Airport). According to Google Maps, the drive is technically 4.5 hours, but traffic can easily turn it into 6 if you plan it during the wrong time of day.

So…ten hours on the road for one night. Is that even worth it? I can see the skepticism in your eyebrows.

In our case, we really enjoyed the Claremont, even though they didn’t end up applying the room upgrade and putting us in a queen-queen room. Sharing a double bed with a restless seven-year-old boy is a recipe for a sleepless night. It is a beautiful hotel, and we stayed nearly free (dratted resort fees!) at a place that typically costs $100s. The kids had an amazing time in the pool and we enjoyed dinner out at an Indian restaurant in Berkeley.

It was a nice, quick getaway. I think they enjoyed themselves, even though they aren’t fans on being in the car for hours on end. A couple movies make a world of difference.

Are one night trips with kids worth it?

It really all depends on your perspective and attitude. In our case, the one night was a fun trip. I didn’t find it stressful at all, as we left early in the day and had plenty of time to enjoy the hotel and its facilities, returning middle of the next day after a morning swim.

I’m sure for many, a one night trip with kids could be super stressful. In our case, the two of our three that I took were 7 and nearly 11 at the time. This made things a whole lot easier than traveling with a little one, even though the kids tended to get carsick a lot (they have been getting better, presumably from spending more time in the car).

The purpose of the trip is important as well. For one-night trips, it is best for them to be getaways where you’re simply trying to enjoy a hotel and maybe see one sight. Nothing extensive, nothing jam-packed. In the case of the New Year’s getaway in 2018, the kids just swam in the evening, we watched a movie (it happened to be Sully), and then swam some more in the morning after a late breakfast at the Best Western. Very enjoyable for all of us. The Claremont getaway was similar, as we were there to simply enjoy the hotel.

There are instances where a one-night trip would not be worth it, if you simply go somewhere and barely have any time before you sleep and then head home. Not fun at all. I guess the minimum recipe for success is to truly make it a one-night, but two-day trip.

Will we do a one-night trip again?

We ended up doing two more one-night trips after this, but out of necessity, as it they were both for doctor or other medical visits. This is entirely different, as trips like this are unavoidable and both were far more stressful.

I’m sure we’ll end up doing a quick one-night getaway now and then, although I do prefer 2-3 nights for quick trips with the kids. For us they can be worth it, depending on the distance and circumstances.

What do you think of one-night trips with kids? Have you ever tried a staycation?

Kings Canyon – Gould Mine Loop Hike in Saguaro National Park

On a beautiful Arizona morning in late April we headed out from the Hampton Inn in Tucson to Saguaro National Park, to the west of the city. The plan? Complete the Kings Canyon – Gould Mine Loop hike, a distance of about 2.1 miles, as an introduction for the kids to the desert.

Although we didn’t make it out of the hotel especially early to beat the heat, it was shaping up to only be in the 80s. I’m not sure we would have attempted this during the heat of midsummer!

Pit stop at the Arizona Sonora Desert Museum

Before we started the hike, we made a quick stop at the desert museum, just to use the restroom.  Even though our time here was super brief, we encountered a rattlesnake. I hadn’t seen one in years. It was right in the parking lot!

Park staff promptly snagged him. With lots of people around, he definitely needed to be re-homed.

I used the encounter to help illustrate the need for immediate obedience from the kids. The last rattlesnake story I recall involved my dad calling my two sisters away from a picnic table at Mount Diablo. A diamondback had started to coil up underneath. Thankfully, they immediately got up and left. Dad then spent the next minute chucking rocks at the reptile until it struck.

With that story fresh in their heads, we headed a bit further down the road to the Kings Canyon trailhead.

Kings Canyon Trailhead

The Kings Canyon – Gould Mine loop hike starts just a short distance down the road from the museum. The trailhead is at a small parking lot off the right side of the road. The Kings Canyon trail starts as a gentle ascent along a dry creekbed.

Although the views from the parking lot are decent, you quickly rise even more and are offered a lovely view of the desert stretching out beyond the way you came.

Unsurprisingly, the mighty saguaro are plentiful. The giant cacti are endemic to Arizona and the state of Sonora, Mexico. This multi-armed monster has to be well over 100 years old.

We stopped frequently, mainly to take in the beautiful desert around us. But also because the kids were already hot and tired.

It’s soooooo hot!

I lost count how many times I heard this during our hike. Even though our kids are native to a fairly warm climate, they have already adopted the utterly Humboldtian disposition of melting when it gets above 85°F. Except if there is a pool around. Then they’re fine. But hiking in the desert? Not a fun proposition (SEE: 3 Tips for Hiking with Kids in the Desert).

I got at least some smiles out of them. They reminisced about the hike we took with their cousins in the Redwoods. Bit different out here, isn’t it?

We reached an intersection that lacked signage, but took the trail that went in the direction I knew we needed to go to connect to the Gould Mine trail. No more than 15 minutes later we found the sign that could take us back around the hill to the parking lot.

kings canyon - gould mine loop hike

The Sonora desert is truly lovely. I’d forgotten how enchanting the U.S. southwest can be.

kings canyon saguaro national park

Even through their complaints, the kids were doing fine. We’d finished up the last of the water, but there was less than half a mile to go.

Our hike lasted maybe an hour and a quarter to complete the 2.1-mile Kings Canyon – Gould Mine loop hike in Saguaro National Park.

Ending an enjoyable desert hike

It was an enjoyable hike for me. It was warm, but certainly not hot. We kept an easygoing pace, and there were no strenuous climbs. You couldn’t ask for a better quick hike.

The kids, on the other hand, were less than thrilled. Even after seeing some cool desert flora and fauna, they wanted to get moving on down the road.

Apparently my daughter’s feet had gotten a little hot during our excursion.

Note: normally I would not have let her do this, but there was hardly another car on the road driving through the park.

Bonus: Valley View Overlook

We drove for another 15 minutes or so from the Kings Canyon trailhead until we hit a dirt road within Saguaro National Park. I had one other point I wanted to explore before hitting the freeway: the View Trail.

view trail saguaro national park

There isn’t much to the view trail. It is maybe a quarter mile, and leads you gently from a small parking lot to a vista of the valley west of Saguaro National Park. Our panorama shot hardly does it justice.

Smiles were back at this point. It was a much easier hike.

And there were a lot more towering cacti.

Due to the ease of the hike and the view, the View Trail is a bit more popular. It certainly wasn’t crowded, but we saw maybe a dozen people during the hike (versus only 1 on the Kings Canyon – Gould Mine loop trail).

Conclusion

Fast pace road trips really don’t let you linger. We enjoyed our brief hikes, first around the Kings Canyon – Gould Mine Loop and then the View Trail in Saguaro National Park. But with the morning spent, it was time to move on. We stopped for a snack in Picture Rocks and then hit the road. Onward to the Pointe Hilton Squaw Peak Resort and time in the pool!

2 Tips for Planning a Last-Minute Trip

After deciding to abort my planned trip to Europe, my wife and I had a long discussion about how to approach my two weeks off. It would have been fairly easy to go back to work (I have been putting in a little time this week), but we decided to see if there were other options on the table. We ultimately settled on the idea of me taking the older two kids on a road trip for a week.

At only six days out, there wasn’t much time to plan. And awards can be expensive. But luckily I have a couple tricks up my sleeve….

Tip #1 – Understand how award space works

Last-minute awards can be a either a big ouch, or they can be a gold mine. It all depends on the loyalty program. Any revenue-based program (i.e. Southwest, JetBlue) will be a big ouch if you need to book a ticket a week out. Delta is usually awful as well. American is meh. United, on the other hand, is a stellar choice. In my experience, United tends to release a lot of award seats close-in. They are my go-to if we are looking for a last-minute award deal.

Not looking too bad for 4 people just a few days out

There is just one big hurdle: the utterly ridiculous close-in booking fee. It’s basically extortion. I can’t decide if I hate it more or less than hotel resort fees.

Booking tickets for the three of us from Arcata to Tucson would cost 37,500 miles and $241.80. Not fun. And not worth it. The space is there, but booking through United is a less-than-ideal option.

Enter Avianca Lifemiles

Avianca LifeMiles are a fantastic alternative. And we have a small pile of them right now from when I signed up for the Avianca Vuela Visa (SEE: Lucrative Offer! New Avianca Lifemiles credit cards). You can also get Lifemiles by transferring your Citi ThankYou Points to that program.

Avianca rolled out a short-haul award chart for the United State last year that divided the USA into 3 regions. All intra-region travel is only 7,500 miles each way, and this includes connections. We can head nearly anywhere in the west for either 2,500 or 5,000 miles less than what United charges! My only word of warning is that the system chokes on awards with more than one connection. And good luck if you have to call an agent (better brush up on your Spanish).

One critical piece of this puzzle is the fact that Avianca doesn’t charge extortion a close-in fee (but they do still charge an annoying $25 award booking fee). I managed to book our tickets out of our local Arcata airport (SEE: The Upstart Arcata-Eureka Airport), a rare treat for personal travel. It cost us a total of 22,500 miles plus $91.80 for the three of us.

Last minute tickets were going for $866 round-trip, so this yields a return of 5.3 cents per mile. In all honesty, we wouldn’t be taking this trip if it wasn’t for miles, so calculating redemption value is a bit silly. What really matters is that we are saving a lot compared to using United miles for the trip.

Tip #2 – Know when it is one-way rental season

A trip like this has been at the back of my mind for some time. Every spring, rental car companies will give you rock bottom rates to get their cars out of the desert, and every fall they will offer you deals to take them back. Why do they do this? Trust me, it has nothing to do with cutting you a deal on your family trip.

This annual cycle is summed up in two words: inventory management. Car rental companies need more cars in certain locations during different times of the year, so instead of paying top dollar to truck them from state to state, they’ll simply cut you a deal to move one for them.

So…in essence I am helping Alamo move a car from Tucson, where nobody wants to be in July, to Sacramento. Whether that is really a better summer destination is up for debate, but Alamo would rather have the car in California than in Arizona. For this I am paying a whopping $101 for an eight day rental.

Similar deals are available from Florida, where you can take cars at a discount back to summer markets in the Northeast. An even better tip: some systems won’t differentiate between the deals offered. On other words, even though the company says “rent in Florida and return in New York” and “rent in Arizona and return in California”, you can actually drive a car all the way across the country! I priced out a two week rental from Miami to San Francisco for $228!! I’ve paid that much for a four day work rental!!!

Stop. I’m getting all excited again. Let me finish up with our trip details…

Planning our time through the Southwest

The hotels easily fell into place for the trip. I have points with most major chains, and there were plenty to pick from at most destinations. The harder issue for me was maximizing value. Do I use the Hilton points? Or do I book with IHG? Or do I pay $55 cash for a nearby Quality Inn and save the points for a better use? I think I got the cost down to ~$100 cash for our 8 nights.

The plan is to make our way from Tucson to Sacramento day by day, averaging 3-4 hours on the road. Sightseeing stops are planned at the Pima Air & Space Museum in Tucson, Saguaro National Park, Sedona, the Grand Canyon, Hoover Dam, Las Vegas, Death Valley, and the Harrah Collection in Reno. I’ve also thrown in a couple of cheap resort hotels where the kids can spend a day in the warmth and water.

I’ve honestly never put together a trip so quickly. Thirty-six hours is probably a record. But I decided that I could salvage the vacation time, and this seemed like one of the best options. More importantly, I hope to make up for how utterly disappointed I left our two older kids after pulling the plug on our Europe trip.

Featured image courtesy of Kentaro Iemoto under CC 2.0 license.  

Trying (and failing) to help our kids with their constant carsickness

Since we’ve had our kids home, we have taken a number of excursions. The most recent was to Disneyland, which was our first trip as an entire family (plus the mother-in-law). Most of the rest of these have been one to three night getaways on which I take just our older two kids.

One thing is always for certain: someone will get sick. And someone will nearly always throw up. Never mind the happy featured photo.

Combating carsickness

Ever since our precious kids first entered our lives back in September 2017, we have been battling carsickness. The complaints are near-constant whenever we drive, ranging from a mild headache to full on you-better-pull-over-i-am-gonna-puke. We had a few instances in Costa Rica where they upchucked, most notably Zion after our day visiting Volcán Irazú (SEE: Visiting Irazu Volcano in Costa Rica).

Locally, they have been doing better. We still get the headaches and mild tummy troubles. But after one bout in November, we haven’t had any puking during our normal, everyday driving.

Long car trips are a whole different animal. Here the puking is almost a given. Our first trip included a 5-hour drive to Oakland where we enjoyed some time in the lounge before boarding a tiny plane to go visit my grandparents (SEE: Escape Lounge Oakland Review, and SEE: Boutique Air Flight Review: the closest I’ll ever come to flying private).

Along the way we picked up breakfast in Ukiah. This was later deposited in Windsor and Berkeley, as each kid successively expelled it. Fortunately, the drive back a couple days later was free from vomit.

Since then we haven’t had a trip without someone puking. Sure, we may be vomit-free on one leg. But it happens at least once, typically on the southbound drive to the Bay or middle of the state.

What do we do?

After our trip to Calistoga for New Year’s (SEE: Celebrating New Year’s 2018), I emailed my mom, explaining that the only thing that was a real bummer on the trip was both kids puking again. I got a two word response: “USE DRAMAMINE!”

Turns out, I already was. But it doesn’t seem to be doing anything for them. They have puked with it and without it. They have also managed fine with and without it. There is no real rhyme or reason.

The only hint I have at a solution is that their tummies seem to do slightly better when full rather than empty. We have tried to leave early in the morning, something I like to do to help the drive pass by more quickly for them. But it is on this leg that someone almost invariably pukes.

Even on our recent trip to Sacramento, the kids couldn’t make it. Lion threw up along Highway 101. Then later along Highway 20. Fortunately, they were both hungry when we reached Williams, and we had a nice late breakfast at Granzella’s.

The Sinclair dinosaur also cheered them up.

Conclusion

I’m still searching for a silver bullet to help our kids. Having full tummies seems to help, as does slowing down. My wife thinks I drive too fast, and maybe the kids tummies do, too. I’ll need to see if this helps much (last trip, it didn’t seem to).

For the record, when I was small I did a lot of upchucking when we took family trips, but eventually grew out of this. I hope the same happens with our kids.

Overview of our fun weekend in Sacramento

Over MLKJ weekend I took our older two kids away again. We previously made a quick trip to visit the great-grandparents in December, followed by an overnight in Calistoga for New Year’s. This is quickly becoming a monthly tradition, as I already have a weekend getaway planned in February.

Each trip gives me some great uninterrupted time with them, and also gives mom a bit of a break. One child is much easier to manage than three.

Rundown on our quick trip

We left early on Saturday, which is already my preferred modus operandi for traveling with the kids. It gives them a couple hours to snooze, and by the time they wake up fully, we usually have less than 3 hours of driving left. I’ve let them watch one movie at this point, and then they only need to entertain themselves for maybe another 90 minutes before we reach our destination.

Our time in the capital of the Golden State was spent seeing old town Sacramento, the California Railroad Museum, and the Sacramento Zoo. I’ll cover each of those separately, among other things, in upcoming posts:

Tacking on work

After I planned the trip, I found out that I needed to get certified ASAP for commercial operation of small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS). While recreational use doesn’t require any sort of permit, you need to pass a test to operate one commercially. My boss approached me about operating a UAS on one of our upcoming projects, and I gladly agreed.

But this did mean I needed to cram and pass the test ASAP. He graciously allowed me to tack the test onto the end of our trip and covered some of our expenses.

So, our final night was booked in Auburn, California (on the company dime), where I scheduled the exam. We have friends there who were able to watch the kids while I took the test (so, so thankful!).

After lunch, we hit the road home. It was a quick but fun weekend!

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