Points, Miles & Life

Travel adventures on this earthly pilgrimage

Category: Local (page 1 of 3)

Wandering through Old Town Sacramento

Having made numerous drives to the foothills of the Sierras to visit family, I’ve passed through Sacramento many times. However, I’ve never actually stopped and truly visited our state capital. My last pass through Sacramento involved arriving on a bus from Reno and catching a train to San Francisco after United canceled my flight. Not a very fun experience.

old town sacramento

It was definitely a lot more fun getting to see the historic section of Sacramento a few weekends ago with our older two kids. We spent some time wandering the streets during our first afternoon in the area, followed by a second visit the next day to see the California Railroad Museum and walk the area some more.

General info on Old Town Sacramento

Old town Sacramento is sandwiched between Interstate 5 and the Sacramento River. I wondered what impact the freeway would have on our experience, but it honestly wasn’t too bad. It is elevated and shielded well enough.

The main section of Old Town Sacramento is  roughly 4 blocks by 2 blocks. You can lazily walk the whole circuit in 20 minutes. There are plenty of neat old buildings and shops to browse, like in any historic downtown.

Parking is fairly easy, but you will have to pay. We spent $4.50 the first day at a metered spot in one of the lots on the south end of Old Town Sacramento. The second day I footed the full $10 at the garage that sits underneath the freeway, which is enough for as long as you’d like to visit. Parking is one of those things I hate paying for and try to avoid. But sometimes it’s not possible.

Walking the Tower Bridge

After wandering around for maybe fifteen minutes, I decided to take the kids to the bridge first before hitting some shops on our way back. The Tower Bridge across the Sacramento River is at the south end of old town, and it affords some pretty cool views of the area.

The bridge is over 80 years old and is on the National Register of Historic Places. It is a vertical-lift bridge, and I believe it is still operational.

From the bridge we got great views of Old town. Everything right up on the river is significantly elevated due to the flooding sometimes experienced by the Sacramento River. If you want a fascinating read, check out this article on the California Megaflood, a disaster that no one every talks about.

There is actually a hotel right in the middle of Old Town Sacramento: the Delta King, located in the historic riverboat bearing the same name (which you can see in the photo above). If you have the money to shell out, consider booking a stateroom as part of your visit. Not sure you could get any cooler than that!

After a jaunt across the bridge and back, it was time to hit up a few of the shops.

First up: candy, of course

With these two kids addicted to sweets, it makes perfect sense that the first shop we visited was Candy Heaven. I made a point of telling the kids that we were “window shopping”, if that is possible with candy.

I’m not sure if it is typical for Candy Heaven, but they offered each of us two free samples from any of the bins with a certain color tag. To the kids chagrin, these were generally the smaller of the candies. I had to remind them that the store was giving them to us. For free. After probably 15 minutes of scouring every corner of the store and deliberating, they finally settled for a couple pieces of assorted hard candy.

Later, we ended up getting a couple caramels as a snack in a different store. This was after a visit to a toy store as well, that had a neat old arcade and some trains clattering above your head in different areas.

Food Old Town Sacramento

We didn’t eat in old town our first evening, although there were a good number of places to choose from. Our second day we hit up a pizza place called Slice of Old Sacramento. As far as pizza goes, it was good. Price was fair. Pizza is one of the few things that I’ll judge a bit harshly, so I’m sure most would enjoy it. We passed up another place called Annabelle’s Pizza and Pasta based on its poor reviews.

I made good on a promise to get the kids ice cream on our second day. There is a great little place that is part of Candy Land (not Candy Heaven) on complete other side of Old Town Sacramento. the kids promptly shared their ice cream with each other. No germaphobes in this house.

There are a number of other cafés, bars, and ice cream places to choose from, including a Mexican place and a Chinese establishment. So you really have your pick.

California Railroad Museum

The California Railroad Museum is located on the northern end of Old Town Sacramento in a large brick building. Part of it is actually an old roundhouse, which is extra cool. There are several locomotives and railcars on the first floor, a good number of which you can explore.

The museum is part of the State Parks, and admission is $12 for adults and half that for kids 6 to 17. Children under 5 are free. I’ll cover our experience at the railroad museum in its own post.


The state capital of California is definitely worth visiting for a couple hours. Make it a solid half day or more if you visit the California Railroad Museum. You could easily combine some time in Old Town Sacramento with a morning at the Sacramento Zoo, or maybe touring the state capital, if your kids are up for an completely full day of seeing the sights.

Santa Rosa Airport Expands to Meet Crushing Demand

Unlike our local Arcata-Eureka Airport, passenger demand at Charles M. Schulz Airport has seen an huge increase over the past several years. Which has been met by a noticeable increase in both flights and airlines serving the small airport.

What hasn’t changed much is the size of the airport. And it needs to. Badly.

Expansion plans have to be altered

Currently, Santa Rosa/Sonoma County Airport is way too small for the number of passenger passing through on a daily basis. Contrary to the loss of service that has been experienced by many airports, Sonoma County has seen strong and steady growth. Numbers jumped this year as more airlines added service after the airport’s $55 million runway expansion project was completed. The airport is poised to see at least a 20% jump in passenger numbers in 2017.

This unprecedented increase has prompted changes to the plans that were initially proposed for the STS expansion. The plans had to be redrawn to deal with both the influx of new service and more passengers. A temporary tent structure will accommodate the crush of passengers until the terminal expansion is completed. Financing for the new expansion project was approved by the County supervisors in September.

STS is a great option for Humboldt travelers

Santa Rosa isn’t all that far away in the scheme of things. Given that the Willits bypass is now in place, you can typically make it nonstop from the Eel Valley to Sonoma County Airport in about 3.5 hours. Sure, it’s a lot longer than the 45 minute trek to ACV. But there are definitely benefits.

First, fares are *much* cheaper. If you’re a family of 4 looking to travel to D.C., you could save upwards of $300 per ticket versus flying out of ACV. Sure, you might save even more flying out of SFO, but you’d be adding another 90 minutes to your drive and more in parking fees. Not to mention generally more in hotel if you’re planning to stay the night.

Second, you have options. Charles M. Shulz Airport is served by Alaska, American, Sun Country, and United. It used to be served by Allegiant on a couple routes. Now that United flies the shortest flight in the U.S. to SFO, a huge United hub, Santa Rosa Airport really is a gateway to the world. You can connect to many destinations across the country and across the globe with only one stop.


I’ll definitely admit that I didn’t like my last experience flying out of STS, and things may be painful in the interim as the airport goes through it’s planned expansion. But looking ahead, I’d say that Sonoma County is an great option for people flying out of northern California.

Au Revoir, Pen Air: Humboldt is Again Stuck with ONE Airline

In a depressing move, PenAir notified our local Arcata-Eureka Airport that they will no longer be flying the ACV-PDX route. And they are dropping it fast. The last flight will be this coming Monday.

This leave us with just United Airlines as our only commercial option (yet again). Getting out from behind the redwood curtain just got a bit harder.

PenAir’s reason for leaving

It seems to be impossible for our area to keep a reasonable amount of commercial air service. My first guess when hearing the news was that the route wasn’t particularly profitable due to the rural nature of our area. The single flight I took on PenAir to Portland didn’t have that high of a load factor (SEE: The Pacific Northwest Stopover “Trick”). However, the United flights I’ve been on are almost always very full (and very expensive).

Turns out that the economics of the route had nothing to do with PenAir’s decision to axe it. The program director for the Humboldt County Aviation Division called the route “very successful”. So what is the problem?

Airlines need pilots

PenAir, like other regional airlines, is suffering from a pilot shortage. Horizon Air (another regional airline that flies under Alaska’s wing) had to cut some flights due to their pilot shortage in June. Pilots are retiring by the hundreds per week, and we can’t seem to fill the ranks with new talent fast enough.

PenAir actually cut all non-essential air service routes in the lower 48 states. This means you can still fly to Portland from Crescent City (an EAS airport) on PenAir, although for most of Humboldt County this is roughly a 2 hour drive north. Hardly ideal. Might as well drive to SFO.


This is sad news for Humboldt. I really liked the new little airline we acquired last year, and had hoped to fly them again. I’ll continue to hold out hope that we will pick up a new option. Three flights per day on United is hardly much of an option (plus they break guitars).

I want to add that if you’re young and considering a career, consider becoming a pilot. The investment isn’t all that much different than a moderately expensive university, but the demand for your skills will not be going away anytime soon. The world will need 637,000 new pilots by 2036 to fill the projected increase in air travel. North America will need 117,000 of those. Airline pilots make good wages, so the multi-year investment should be entirely worth it.

Join Me for a Second Travel Hacking Seminar!

Back in March I offered a free seminar to friends and family (SEE: Reserve a Seat at the First Humboldt Travel Hacking Seminar). A few people asked me if I would hold a second one, and the answer was “most likely yes.” Originally, I had hoped to plan a second one during early May. Although that window has now come and gone, I have now arranged it for early June. Here are the details:

  • Date: Monday, June 5, 2017
  • Time: 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. (might run long…last time did)
  • Venue: Ferndale Pizza Company (607 Main Street, Ferndale)
  • Format: Presentation will run about 90 minutes, then Q&A (as well as some Q&A mixed in).
  • Other: Hopefully we’ll have refreshments like last time (cookies and coffee/water)!

The seminar is free, not because the info isn’t valuable, but I don’t want to charge for a starter-level event like this. I really enjoy helping people save money on travel!!

Please *do* RSVP via this link, if you’re planning on attending. Please feel free to contact me with any questions before the event.

Hope to see you all there!!

So close, yet so far

Last week my wife and I were returning from a wonderful 5 night getaway in Banff and Calgary, Alberta. Banff National Park is spectacular, even in shoulder season when there is lingering snow and cool temperatures (SEE: Banff, Alberta in 14 photos).

Our travel plans home included a midday non-stop flight to SFO out of Calgary on United, and then a 5.5 hour drive home back up the coast.

Flying 1,000 miles? No problem

Our flight was uneventful, and we landed in San Francisco just in time to catch the rush hour traffic headed north.

After fighting our way through Santa Rosa, the road finally opened up. We started counting down the final 3 hours of our drive, anticipating being home in our lovely apartment around 10:00 p.m.

Driving 270 miles? A bit more difficult

We got as far as Leggett, only to be stopped by a “Road Closed” sign. A CalTrans worker soon informed us that a problematic hillside had decided to fall into the road again, and 101 was completely closed. The road had just opened from the previous slide the day before. Shoulda figured it would slip again. *Sigh.* Back to Willits we’ll go.

Willits, the closest town to where we got turned around, is only about 100 miles from where we live. Because the road was closed at the worst pinch point possible, there was no easy to way to just drive around.

Many of you who are locals understand the major issues we’ve had this winter, as 101 has seen multiple closures. When 101 is closed at Leggett, you only have 2 options:

  1. Take a local dirt and gravel road that is not intended for a large amount of traffic (and by all accounts has been brutalized this winter)
  2. Drive 7 hours around, which is over 3 times what the drive *should* take!

Because we drive a minivan and not a 4×4 pickup, the only reasonable option was the latter.

The long way home

We spent the night at the Super Duper Pooper 8 in Willits, basically just sleeping and showering.  The next morning we hit the road at 7:00, headed south to take Highway 20 over to I5. By a little after 9:00 we had reached the valley. An hour later we made a pit stop in Red Bluff before heading back over the mountains.

The last few hours were the worst, as we drove winding highway 36. The road has taken a beating this year, as so many people have had to drive around the closures on highway 101.

Finally, we arrived home a little after 1:00. I literally headed straight to the office and into a meeting, arriving at 1:30 on the dot.

Will this ever get better?

Honestly, this sort of thing has become par for the course when we travel. Some situation *always* seems to present itself that we have to work around.

I just have to resign myself to the fact that getting in and out of Humboldt will never be an easy proposition. Yet I still seem to convince myself that one of these times things will be different.

Header image courtesy of CalTrans. 

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