Points, Miles & Life

Travel adventures on this earthly pilgrimage

Category: Kids (page 1 of 2)

Braving Back-to-Back-to-Back-to-Back-to-Back Trips!

Yes. There are 5 backs in there. Looks like we’re going to start 2018 off with a bang!

This wasn’t the plan, trust me. It sorta just happened. We planned one major trip for January, thinking that was plenty. But then the rest slowly got penciled in, so here we are. It all starts with a fury this week.

Work trip to Needles

This one was the second-to-last addition. The company I work for was recently contracted for a small project in Needles, so I get to fly in and out of Las Vegas for a single-day site visit. Due to the flight schedule between Arcata and Vegas and the 2-hour drive to Needles, I have to make it a 2-nighter.

Work isn’t my concern. That part will be easy. It’ll just be the first time I am completely away from the kids for even one night. I’m a bit nervous to see how they’ll do.

And it starts later today. I’ll be on my way to the airport after lunch.

New Year’s celebration

I took advantage of the Best Western promotion to plan New Year’s Eve away with our older two kids. Originally, I was eyeing the first weekend in January, but we have relatives coming up then. Honestly, New Year’s works even better.

If you know me well, you know I shut down about 10:00 p.m. Sometimes 9:00, or even 8:00 p.m. Staying up late is not my thing. But I already know the kids want to party til midnight, so I’m trying to make this as painless as possible for all of us.

And taking them to a hotel with a pool where they can have fun, eat (a little) junk food, and stay up late sounds like the best plan. My wife can put the little guy to bed and welcome 2018 by getting some quality shuteye.

MLJK Weekend with the older two

This one is still tentative. Given the busy schedule of the rest of the month, it may get axed. But it may be a necessity to give mom some time to catch up around the house. And continue potty training the youngest.

My first little weekend getaway with the older two went really well. They didn’t really care for the 5-hour car drive, but they enjoyed the flight. So what’d I plan? You guessed it: another 5-hour car drive. Yeah…haven’t told them yet.

I decided that it wasn’t worth burning miles for a trip that short. Either we’ll find a good points deal in the Bay, or we’ll stick with my plan to maximize my IHG Accelerate promotion at a Holiday Inn in the Sacramento area. I can offset some of the out of pocket cost with cash back, but not the whole thing. The latter (and preferred) option depends on how our January budget looks.

Disneyland!

This was the big surprise trip for the kids for Christmas, and the original one on the schedule. We didn’t expect to take them so soon, but I have an “in” that can get us a steep discount on the tickets. Since this is the biggest cost (free flights and hotel is cake), it made the trip much more doable.

back to back trips disneyland

My mother-in-law did chip in as well, so we are staying at a Disney hotel for part of the trip, which will be a first for me. I am no Disney guru. Travel hacking Disney is a whole new level of obsession.

And then right back to LA

This time it is mom’s turn. It’ll be the first time that my wife has done a solo trip since we’ve been married, if I recall correctly. Maybe ever. She has done a few with her mom, but I can’t think of a single time she has flown or stayed in a hotel solo.

So what is the impetus for this? A day of exercise and dancing with Derek and Julianne Hough was enough to make her jump. It looks like that her first extra cash from starting work again will be put to good use for a one-day intensive in Los Angeles.

The only tricky part is how close it is to the other trip. If only we’d picked the next weekend for our Disneyland trip. Kinda locked in at this point. Looks like we’ll be heading home Wednesday and turning right back around to Oakland on Saturday.

What’ll the kids and I be doing? Good question. I not 100% sure yet. I booked a hotel (for free with Wyndham points) in SF for two nights in case we want to stay there. We may just go back home to Ferndale for Sunday, but that would mean even more time on the road.

After that?

Our kids don’t know it yet, but I’ve asked my parents to watch them for two nights in February so Kels and I can have a romantic weekend. Well…mostly romance. We’ll also be headed to Global Entry appointments. In any case, I’m definitely looking forward to this.

We have one more trip that is in the works, but I can’t spill the beans on that yet. Hopefully I have it all finalized sometime next month.

Final thoughts

Are we crazy? Probably. Do I think we can make it through these with flying colors? Absolutely. Lack of confidence is rarely my issue.

But in case you start wondering if I’m still sane, feel free to drop me a note once we’re on the other side. 🙂

Christmas Surprise: We’re going to Disneyland!

Back when I planned our quick trip to visit my grandparents, I mentioned that a couple more trips were in the works. Well, it’s time to let the cat is out of the bag: we’re going to Disneyland next month!

The trip is one of the gifts we decided to get the kids. As Kels and I have sought to prioritize experiences over material things, gifting a trip for Christmas is much more up our alley than buying the kids a lot of stuff (but they did get a lot of stuff, too).

But given that Disneyland is an expensive destination, so how are we able to afford this so quickly?

Travel hacking a Disney trip

Scoring discounts on Disney is not for the faint of heart. The general consensus is that you really can’t get better than 10-20% off on Disney hotels and admission. And the cost of entry is ridiculous. Entry for our family of 5 to one park for one day would cost approximately $485. And we’re looking to go for 2 days on a Park Hopper pass, which will set us back at least twice that. No matter how you slice it, this isn’t an easy trip to take for cheap. Forget about free.

A strategy I would employ is picking up a couple cash-back cards with a decent bonus to offset the enormous cost of taking your family to the Magic Kingdom. If you’re new to the points world and haven’t applied for many cards, pick up a Chase Sapphire Preferred card if you haven’t (SEE: 5 Reasons the Chase Sapphire Preferred is the Best Starter Travel Credit Card) and then look into a Capital One Venture and/or Barclaycard Arrival+. I don’t typically recommend these cards out the gate, but they will get you most of $1,000 in flexible points you can use toward Disney tickets.

Some warehouse clubs offer Disney gift cards at a slight discount. Factoring in the use of a cash back card, you probably can’t do better than ~5% off using this strategy. It’s something, but it’s still not much. In all honesty, there is no easy way to hack Disney like airfare, where you can get a couple sign up bonuses and fly to Europe in business class for less than $200 out of pocket.

But there are ways. You’ll just need to search a bit harder for them. Disney will never be my forte. When I attended the Family Travel 4 Real Life conference this past May, one session was completely dedicated to hacking Disney. It’s is own world.

If travel hacking Disney is of interest to you, let me point you to a few other resources:

So…how are we able to take our family of 5 to Disneyland next month?

It’s who you know

As is the case with many things in life, sometimes it’s more about who you know than what you know. Turns out that I have a coworker whose sister works for Disney corporate. She can walk most of us in for free for one day (possibly all of us if she can have a coworker meet her at the park, which she is trying to make happen). This means our tickets will either be free or heavily discounted. If we don’t all get walked in for free, the remaining two that we need to buy will be ~50% off.

Since my mother-in-law loves Disneyland, we invited her along. My one and only time visiting the park in Anaheim was with their family, long before my wife and I were married. They used to go annually. We got them tickets last year as their Christmas gift.

I’m not sure how she put it all together, but my mother-in-law managed to work some magic for all of us. She has had a Disney Visa card for as long as I can remember, and the tickets for the second day are part of a package she booked in conjunction with a Disneyland hotel. Apparently now was the time to put the points to good use. I’m not complaining.

So now that we will be out at most a mere $150 for tickets for two days, we just have to put the travel together.

Flights south

This part is cake. We had a number of options, so it was all a function on convenience, timing, and maximizing point redemption. Since there were so many of us, it makes the most sense to fly out of the Bay Area rather than Arcata or even Santa Rosa. Alaska has reasonable nonstop flights to John Wayne Airport (Santa Ana), which is the closest to Anaheim and Disneyland. I’ll happily avoid the pit that is LAX.

For the 6 of us I spent a mere 19,600 Amex Membership Rewards (before my 50% back perk dies!), a $75 Alaska voucher, and $28.40 cash. Not much out of pocket. Cash prices would have been $470 for all six of us.

Thanks to a promotion, the kids will each be earning a bonus 5,000 Alaska miles as new Alaska MileagePlan members. This means our family will earn a total of 20,000 Alaska miles for our quick trip. It’s basically like trading our MR points for Alaska miles. Totally, totally worth it.

What about hotels near Disneyland?

There are a number of hotels available near Disneyland, but I quickly focused on a couple options for the six of us. The one that made the most sense was the Homewood Suites about a mile from the park. The points redemption rate was reasonable, and it could fit the six of us.

I also eyed the Howard Johnson across from the park, as we have a good number of Wyndham points, but it would tougher to swing for 6. For 5 I’d do it in a heartbeat, and request a crib. The Best Western right across the street also seemed like a decent option, but I don’t have enough points to swing it. Since we are going to be in the park all day for 2 days, the hotel is little more than a place to crash and sleep, so staying at a more budget place was an option on the table.

But all my ideas got tossed out the window with my mother-in-law’s plan.  Now we’ll be staying on-property, just a quick walk from the park. I’ve never stayed at a Disney hotel (and never planned to!), so this will be a whole new experience for us.

Our one night of airport hotel is at the Embassy Suites SFO for 42,000 Honors points. I wish San Francisco airport hotels were cheaper, but they are in line with the rest of the area. The advantage here is free breakfast for all of us.

Conclusion

Disney is high on many families travel lists, and with the cost of tickets so high, it is often a vacation that they must save long and hard to make happen. Fortunately, thanks to family and friends, we have a nice shortcut. If not for these, we’d be saving for a Disney vacation for at least a year.

Images courtesy of Tuxyso and Norberak Egina under CC 3.0 license

A Successful First Getaway with Kids!

If you recall my post a couple weeks ago, you’d know that I took a quick weekend getaway with our two eldest kids. Mom and the toddler stayed behind to hold down the fort (and work on something very important).

Now we are on the other side of that adventure, and we are not only all alive, but everyone involved had a great time. Sure, there were a couple low points, such as both kids vomiting (at different times) during our five hour drive to the Bay Area. But hey, not everything had to go perfectly.

Ever present car sickness

One thing I noticed is that the kids really, REALLY prefer air travel to car travel. We had several bouts of car sickness while in Costa Rica, and things really haven’t improved since we’ve been home. We don’t give them Dramamine when running errands locally, but I failed to have it on hand for our drive south, which turned out to be problematic.

Beyond the upset tummies, the kids are prone to headaches while in the car. Like, all the time. We’ve read this could also be motion-related, but I hadn’t ever heard of this until the past couple months. The headaches are worse than the nausea, as we end up with grumpy kids for the whole trip rather than one good puke.

I thought about axing the idea of taking a weekend night away each month with the older two after our drive, but they did a lot better on the way home. I’m planning to just power through, and pick places a bit closer to home. We need to get them used to more time in the car. I’ll just make sure we always have Dramamine on hand. And Ziplocs for puke-catching.

Visiting my grandparents

After our adventurous drive to the Bay, we chilled in the airport lounge before almost missing our flight. You can find my write-up on our experience over at Points with a Crew:

After almost missing our flight (yeah…read that review), we arrived safe and sound in Merced where we were greeted by my grandma and grandpa, our kids’ tatarabuelos. The kids were initially shy, as is typical, but they did warm up well to them.

For my part, I really enjoyed catching up with my grandparents. Both have had some health issues in the past year or two, and it was good to see them doing well. Grandma plans to come up soon, so the kids will get to see her again.

Riding a horse!

This was one of the biggest highlights for the kids. My grandparents live outside Merced, in a little town called Cathey’s Valley. It is a blip on the map between I-5 and Mariposa along the highway to Yosemite.

The plus to living in the county is that they have 5 acres. And they have a knack for acquiring horses. When I was a teen, they had four. Now they have seven.

Fortunately, one of them was ride-able. This made the kids’ day!

Since the little guy didn’t come on the trip, grandma and grandpa sent us home with a stick horse!

Conclusion

Our two nights were over too quickly, and soon we had to head home again. The return drive up 101 was long, and the kids complained. Overall, I still think it was a success and would be willing to do it again.

The travel horizons are already looking way more full than I originally  intended. More on that in another post…

Planes, Planning, and Potty Training

Yes, my already limited blogging frequency has taken a nose dive. But life has been a bit different of late. With the combined demands of three kids and a full time job upon me, I’ve hardly had time to keep up any writing, either here or for Points with a Crew.

If you recall, we finally arrived home after seven weeks away in Costa Rica on November 5, 2017, now a family of five. Our trip home on Southwest Airlines included a great miles and points angle. You can read our adoption story here if you’re interested (although our family blog suffers from lack of attention as well).

But now back to the title. You might be wondering what planes, planning, and potty training have to do with each other. Let me connect the dots.

Planning my first trip with the kids

Yup. That didn’t take long. It took me less than three weeks being home to plan our first getaway. I honestly thought I’d make it a bit longer. I’ve actually partially planned three trips, but I can’t reveal the other two quite yet. When you have over a million points and miles in the bank, they kinda burn a hole in your pocket.

The idea started from one simple desire: I think it’d be cool to fly Boutique Air. Never heard of them? Yeah, I hadn’t either until earlier this year.

Boutique Air is a small carrier that flies entirely Essential Air Service routes. They fly primarily Pilatus PC-12 aircraft. Simply taking a flight in one of these planes is the main draw I have to them.

I’m used to flying on mostly Boeing 737s and Embraer E175 aircraft, both of which are of reasonable, unremarkable size. The biggest plane I’ve flown on is the A380. The smallest plane in which I’ve ever flown is a Saab 340 on PenAir between Arcata and Portland (sadly, the route  has been discontinued). It has about 34 seats.

But the Pilatus PC-12 is substantially smaller than that, with a mere nine seats. Awesome, right?

So what does potty training have to do with this?

As I hesitantly broached the trip idea with my wife, she was surprisingly behind it. I only wanted to take the older two kids, and just for a weekend away. One of her immediate thoughts was that it would be the perfect time to start potty training our three-year-old. Boom. That settles it.

So I booked myself and our older two on a round-trip flight on Boutique Air from Oakland to Merced. We’ll drive to the Bay, park, enjoy a super quick flight, visit my grandparents for two nights, and the fly the short hop back and head home. Meanwhile my wife will be reading enthralling titles to our little one, such as “Where’s the Poop?“. Honestly, she is looking forward to only having one kid for a couple days, even if much of the time will be spent with him in the bathroom.

We haven’t told our kids any of the plans, but we plan to this weekend. The older two aren’t crazy about long car trips, but I am hoping to drive the morning leg super early so that they can sleep through half (or more) of it. My parents always did this with my siblings and me when we were little. I’m really looking forward to our little getaway.

The closest I’ll ever come to flying private

I figure that flying private is something that’ll never be a part of my future. So flying on a tiny 9-seater Pilatus, often used as a corporate aircraft, will be about as close as I can get. Look for a review of the experience on Points with a Crew in about 2 weeks.

Given that our bank account has taken a hit after spending almost two moths out of the country, planning a trip that is free or close to free is a must. But this is the beauty of miles and points. Given that a round-trip between Oakland and Merced is as low as $37 on Boutique Air, you really can’t beat the price.

I covered our $111 airfare (total for three people!) with the remainder of our Arrival miles, and I’ll use some cash back earned from gift card reselling and manufactured spending to cover most of the cost of parking and gas. Lodging is covered since we’re staying with family. Easy peasy.

Restraining myself from planning more

Like I mentioned above, I already have two more trips in the works, one of which is pretty nailed down. Given that we’re now free from waiting for our adoption to happen, the schedule is wide open. Which ends up being a problem. Since I follow fare and award deals pretty closely, every time I come across a new one, I want to pull the trigger. We need to wait a bit more. Our kids definitely need some time to adjust. We’ve only been home a matter of weeks.

Eventually, I do hope our kids will enjoy travel as much as my wife and I do. They were champs on our first flight, and my daughter remarked that she much preferred flying to driving. But we still need to get them into a rhythm at home, and taking frequent trips, even just for a weekend, might hinder this goal.

So I’m content now looking forward to our quick weekend blast down to the middle of the state and back. Here’s hoping our youngest potty trains in a weekend. 🙂

Featured image courtesy of Boutique Air under CC 4.0 license.

Our First Time Flying with Kids

On Saturday my wife and I *finally* returned to the U.S. with our kids. The adoption trip was long, and we almost didn’t get to come home on the Southwest flights we booked. But in the end it all worked out exactly as we hoped.

The trip was our first time flying with kids. We’ve traveled plenty as a couple, and at this point the process is routine. But traveling with three children is an entirely different experience. We were a bit worried how our kids would react to their first time on a plane. Overall, our trip went quite well, something for which I am extremely grateful.

Much of our success is likely due to the fact that our children (thankfully) didn’t have any severe anxiety about flying and are well behaved on the whole. But part of our success can likely be attributed to some proactive measure we took. Here is the rundown on our first time flying with kids.

Combating kids’ fears of flying

Our kids were a bit nervous about their first flight, but they were also excited. I tried to play off the latter as much as possible. Over a few weeks before the trip, I took some time to show them some photos of us on previous flights, some YouTube videos of takeoff, and pictures of airports.

Even with those measures, they still expressed some doubts and fears. The question at the forefront of their minds was the safety of the experience. They seemed a bit incredulous when I explained to them that flying is safer than driving in a car. That age-old issue of perceived versus actual risk.

Since statistics are impossible for them to fully comprehend, I switched to relying on personal experience. I told them that I have flown a good amount (LOL – a mere 120,000 miles) and have never been on a flight that has had serious problems. My one diverted flight doesn’t really count since it was due to a medical emergency.

Checking all the baggage and navigating security

We arrived at SJO airport with our six checked bags, one carry on, and five personal items. This was waaaay more luggage than I’ve ever wanted. We brought FOUR checked bags to Costa Rica. Sadly, we had to buy one more to fit all our kids’ stuff. Adding in my mother-in-law’s bag finished the half dozen. I hope to never, ever travel with this much luggage again.

Fortunately, we were flying Southwest, so the ridiculous amount of luggage didn’t cost us anything. The kids were eager to roll around a bag, so that took one off our hands. The toddler worked against us, though, as he insisted on carrying the backpack we’d (over)packed for him, but needed mom to help hold it up with one hand.

The kids curiosity morphed into restlessness at the check-in counter since things took so long. One bag was 55 pounds, so we had to do the last-minute shuffle with the contents (I’m sure everyone else in line hated us). Since the three kids were pretty much only getting in the way, I finally had them go wait with grandma. This is when I reminded myself that I needed to talk them through everything.

Taking time to explain things

Kids definitely do best when you explain the plan to them ahead of time. It was amazing how much better things went once we got all of us into a routine during our stay in Costa Rica. Knowing what is coming next helps them immensely.

When we are about to do something new (such as flying), I try to explain the situation and experience as much as possible. I also try to brief them on potential problems we may encounter. This is a great thing to do for activities beyond flying, but it definitely helped us during our first time flying with kids.

As we navigated the airport and plane, I did my best to explain each part of the process to them. First, it was the security experience. Then waiting at the gate (or going on little walks in the terminal) before boarding. Finally, boarding the aircraft. Talking them through things really helped everything go smoothly and made our first time flying with kids much easier.

 

Boarding our first flight!

One of the benefits of flying Southwest is the family boarding process. Even though we were assigned boarding positions in the high Bs, we still took advantage of the Family Boarding offered between the A and B groups. Our kids were 3, 7 (barely), and 10, and going by the book, they should have only let one of us board with the youngest. However, the gate agent was very gracious, and we all boarded together.

The kids were super excited as we walked the jetway.

first time flying with kids

I was ecstatic that this was the dominant reaction instead of fear.

Since there were plenty of empty seats when we boarded, we were able to settle into a single row across the plane. Arranging seats as a group of six on a 737 is easy. I sat with the older two while mom and grandma managed the toddler.

first time flying with kids

The kids oohed and aahed a bit at the other planes, especially any they saw moving. San José airport isn’t all that busy (compared to say, SFO), so we only really got to see one other plane take off.

Taxi and takeoff

The kids’ excitement went up a few more notches the instant we started moving. They were both glued to the window. I was just as excited, but more so because taking off meant we were actually headed home.

Our three-year-old was hands-down the most excited. He didn’t take his eyes off the window. Every single plane he saw as we taxied was just as exciting as the previous one. He probably shouted “avión!” a dozen times.

No, he was not seated like this for takeoff

The looks on the kids’ faces was priceless when the plane started accelerating down the runway. Like with everything else, I tried to give the kids a little heads up that we were about to take off and what it would feel like. When the engines spooled up and we started hurtling down the runway, they were all smiles.

Once we were airborne, there was even more excitement as they pointed at the buildings below and at the hills of their beautiful country. With all the change that had happened to them in so short a time, I was thankful to see them smiling and laughing.

Soon we’d climbed into the clouds. With nothing left to view, the kids started digging through their bags for stuff with which to play.

What can you pack besides electronics?

This may be a hard road, but we’re trying to heavily limit our kids’ electronics intake in general. We had an iPad on hand with a couple movies loaded on it, but we hoped the kids could entertain themselves with other things for most of the flight.

My wife packed all three kids’ backpacks with various toys, drawing pads, and snacks. We made sure to hide them so that they would be a surprise for the trip. As we were leaving the hotel, we gave them the backpacks. Even then we made them wait to open them until we were seated at the gate.

The whole idea worked quite well. They *loved* discovering what we had packed for them, and their new toys kept them entertained for quite a while on our flight to Houston. I did break out the iPad for music.

A definite winner was the Boogie Board drawing pad (which I guess is technically electronic). The kids could draw as much as they liked, but without the hassle of pens or pencils and paper. It even allowed us to play several rounds of tic-tac-toe and other games.

In the air – our first time flying with kids

My biggest concern was our *very* active three-year-old who has trouble sitting still for anything. Two 4-hours flights might have been a very long day.

Things started out well.  The little man had two adults to help entertain him, and he had snacks to eat. I got my hopes up that it might be smooth sailing the whole trip.

Alas, this was too much to ask. About an hour into the flight we had our first round of tears. He was getting squirmy, and mom finally had to hold him for a bit. How upsetting that is. Luckily, he doesn’t usually throw a fit for more than minute or two, and soon he was back to playing with his stuffed dinosaur.

There were a couple more incidents of excessive squirming and a few more bouts of tears due to making him sit so long. Fortunately, his crying is subdued enough that I wasn’t worried about it bothering other people too much. It wasn’t an intentional choice, but we’d also managed to sandwich ourselves between two other families, one of which had a lap child. I’m sure they understood completely, if they even noticed.

When a patch of turbulence hit, I got a bit worried. I thought our kids might freak out. But they really didn’t react at all. Granted, it wasn’t all that strong, but I was thankful that this wasn’t an issue (NOTE: on our second flight, a patch of turbulence did end up making our ten-year-old scream). The more frequent comment we got was that it didn’t feel like we were moving at all.

The fact that Southwest also loaded us up with snacks every chance they could (I don’t remember this from previous experiences?) really made the kids’ day. Sure, we didn’t think that a diet of chips and coke is the best thing for them, but hey, we wanted them to enjoy the experience.

My daughter did remark that she enjoyed flying much more than driving (yay!). Why? Apparently, it was because I wasn’t telling them “I can’t talk right now” at all. San José traffic and Costa Rica’s mountain roads often required all my concentration, and this is my standard response when they barrage me with questions.

Teaching our kids basic flying etiquette

I couldn’t help myself on this one. As things seemed to be going smoothly enough (i.e. our first time flying with kids was in fun mode and not survival mode), I figured it would be good to start teaching the kids good flying etiquette.

We ran through the basic stuff first: getting out of the aisle, stowing under-seat luggage, not reclining the seat before takeoff. I also ran through seat items such as seatbelt use, air vents (I had to help them, obviously), and the reading light and flight attendant call buttons. I instructed them not to tough the latter.  The older two listened well and did just fine.

Later on, I tackled some other items, such as being gentle when opening and closing the tray table and not using the seats in front of you as a hand hold getting up or down. The latter is a major pet peeve of mine. It turned out that the kids never asked to recline the seat (nor did the people in front of us), so we didn’t have to deal with that at all.

They did well, and I’m sure they will get even better on subsequent fights. But on Day 1, I already feel like they are air travel all-stars.

Landing in Houston

The kids became excited as we started to descend. This quickly turned to a bit of anxiety for our eldest. She did *not* like the feeling of descending in the airplane.

We had a brief freak-out moment as the plane touched down, but this quickly turned to relief as we were now back on terra firma. I failed to explain that taxiing and waiting to deplane part, so we did endure some complaining about not getting off the airplane all that quickly.

We did end up with a dirty toddler diaper on the final part of the flight. I figured we could change this quickly before we got to customs. We had no such luck. As this was our kids’ formal entry into the U.S., the process took quite a while. Customs at Houston Hobby Airport is still worlds better than customs at George Bush Intercontinental. I’m thankful a 3-hour customs ordeal was *not* part of our first time flying with kids. We’ll have to save that for later (or get them all Global Entry).

The final part of our adventure included navigating security, chowing down some pizza, and then rushing to catch our connection to the Bay Area. Five hours later we touched down in California. I never thought I’d ever say I was happy to be back in Oakland.

Final thoughts

Overall, our first time flying with kids ended up going about as smoothly as I’d hoped. We prepped them pretty well, and it paid off. The older two thoroughly enjoyed the experience, and I’m certainly not afraid to take our toddler on another flight, either.

Most of all I hope that this means they’ll all quickly become great little travelers!

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