Points, Miles & Life

Travel adventures on this earthly pilgrimage

Category: Europe (page 1 of 4)

TBT: Getting Lost in Metz, France

My first Throwback Thursday post recounted how I got my wife and myself lost in Rome back in 2016, and I figured I’d follow up with another misadventure. This one is a bit more recent, as it occurred during my week in Europe with the kids last year. It didn’t make the original set of stories I blogged from our trip, but probably should have. Me getting lost is not a normal occurrence, and the fact the kids were along just made things that much more stressful.

Our tricky return plan to CDG Airport

When I initially looked into how to get us back from Luxembourg to Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport, the train was the preferred option. Tickets were fairly reasonable, and even considering the the two transfers, one in Metz and the other in Paris, it wasn’t a bad option. Not cheap for three people, but not bad. It would also give us most of the day in Luxembourg before the afternoon train departed.

So off to Paris we went,  spending three lovely days in the French capital (Day 1, Day 2, Day 3). Then it was off to Luxembourg (SEE: Our Whirlwind 44 Hours in Luxembourg) for a few days. It was on this day that I belatedly realized I hadn’t actually booked the tickets mentioned above. Although I had settled on a plan, I had failed to book the return leg. No matter. I would do it the morning before we left.

Except there was just one problem: the prices had gone up substantially. We would be spending quite a bit more than I anticipated. Exploring other options, I finally decided that booking a rental car from Metz to CDG directly was the cheapest and fastest option. We would still need to take the train from Luxembourg to Metz, but that was a quick journey and inexpensive.

I prepped…just not enough

This would be only the second time I have ever driven in a foreign country that is not named Canada or Mexico. But with several weeks of driving in San José, Costa Rica under my belt, I had no qualms about driving in France. The streets might be a bit tighter in the cities, but I would be doing mostly highway driving. Or so I thought. 

I carefully mapped out our route. I had directions noted down on paper that would take us from the center of Metz to the highway toward Paris. It was a series of only a few turns, and then it would be smooth sailing to the airport. I noted down the freeway exit as well, but I figured that once we got that far, there would be clear signs for Charles de Gaulle. 

But all this went out the window. When we arrived at the rental car center, it dawned on me that there weren’t any cars parked in the tiny front lot. Turns out they’re actually kept underground in a garage beneath the train station. We hopped in and took off in our tiny Citroen, and that was when things went off the rails. 

Instead of exiting to the east, like I’d planned, the garage spit us out going west. I hadn’t studied the streets on this side of the station and only had a vague idea of how to get back toward where we needed to be. Where was a paper map when you needed one?!? I should have bitten the bullet and just paid for a local SIM. At least then I would have an easy way of getting us out of this predicament.

I did the best I could to navigate toward the freeway, but instead got completely turned around in the middle of Metz. Driving a stick shift along narrow streets wasn’t the issue (SEE: 5 reasons why you should rent a car with a manual transmission). The mess of confusing roads that weren’t arranged in any sort of grid-like fashion was. I finally stopped the car by an old church to de-stress and think. We’d been driving almost 15 minutes, and we weren’t any closer to leaving Metz.

Navigating the old-fashioned way

Even though I was quite turned around, I eventually found my way back to the train station. Using what? The sun, of course. I’d finally figured out that we’d been weaving mostly south instead of west, like I’d originally thought (thank the very rough Google map). Keeping the sun on the left, I eventually spied a sign for Gare du Metz. Following this took eventually us onto a street that dropped us under the station and then back up onto the road I wanted to be on in the first place!

After that it was smooth sailing, following the signs to Paris and taking the few turns necessary to approach Charles de Gaulle airport from the east.

We arrived a bit late, but the Holiday Inn Express CDG Airport gave us a restful sleep before a nice flight home on an Air France A380 in economy.

Conclusion

In hindsight, I’m still happy with the choice I made. It was hectic and frustrating in the moment, but love driving. Flying at 130 kmh over the hills of Lorraine and Champagne on a beautiful evening is an experience I will not forget.

But for the “normal” traveler, I would recommend the train. If we were on an extended adventure through the French countryside, a car would be critical. But this was just to get us back to the airport. Save yourself the potential headache and travel by rail.

TBT: The Time I Got My Wife and I Lost in Rome

As my first “Throwback Thursday”, I figured I’d recount how I got my wife and myself lost in Rome during our European adventure in 2016 (SEE: Thirty Days in Europe). Getting lost is not a normal occurrence for me, which made it that much more interesting a situation.

We’d spent the day in Tivoli, in the gardens of the Villa d’Este. It was a lovely experience, and one of my wife’s favorite parts of our trip to Italy. I highly recommend taking a day trip there from Rome.

We headed back to Rome the exact way we’d come, by train, arriving into the Roma Tiburtina station where we’d transfer to the light rail / metro back to our hotel south of the city center.

It was at this point we ran into a hiccup: I didn’t have any more cash to buy metro tickets. I also wanted to avoid drawing out any more before we left Italy. Plus, we were already in the train station with no ATM in sight, and getting back to the hotel was all we wanted to do. We’d deal with getting more cash after we moved on to Ireland (strange logic, in the moment, as the currency is the same).

Finding a train kiosk, I realized that these took credit card. Pulling up the list of stations, I found Magliana. Our hotel was near the EUR Magliana station which is where we’d begun basically every day.

So I bought tickets and we hopped on the next train. Easy peasy.

EUR Magliana is not the same as Magliana

I mean, the thought crossed my mind that these are not the same station. There was a second set of tracks parallel to the rail at EUR Magliana, which made me suspect the two could possibly be co-located. At least they should be pretty close, right?

Wrong.

We were getting close to our station when I realized that something was amiss. There was a hill to our right, and as far as I’d noticed, there were any real hills near our hotel. We were headed west or southwest, as we were supposed to be, but things just didn’t look right. Sure enough, we got to the Magliana stop, and it was not the one I expected.

Stepping off the train, we looked around. There were two buildings I recognized in the distance, but they looked different. My wife started to get a bit worried. I’d brought us to the wrong spot and had no idea how to get back to the hotel. Without cell service, without WiFi, and without a paper map, I had no way of pinpointing where we were.

Given the orientation of the buildings, and the placement of the hill, I finally concluded that we must be across the Tiber river from the EUR Magliana station, maybe a full kilometer from the hotel, which should be somewhere sorta near one of the tall(ish) buildings. Now how do we get over to where we need to be?

No data. No Italian. No worries?

We set off on foot in the general direction of (where I thought was) the hotel. Soon we found a bus stop, but I did not recognize either of the numbers. We’d only taken the bus once, preferring to take the metro into the city each day.

I did my best to follow the bus route, making a right when we came to a T-intersection, and then hanging a left when I saw another stop that direction. We then crossed over a highway. We were getting closer to the buildings, but all I could see was riparian vegetation on one side, where I assumed the river must be, and now a highway on the other.

We came to a bus stop that appeared to be the last one before the road merged with the highway. Walking along a Italian highway with tons of traffic and no shoulder was something I wanted to avoid.

There was another couple at the station, and I did my best to ask them if the bus was running. It was Sunday, and I didn’t know if this affected the schedule. I pointed over to where we were trying to go. To say I know some minimal Italian is a major overstatement. I can read it well enough to get the gist of the meaning, but beyond that I am nearly useless.

Hysterically, Italian was also not this couple’s first language, as best I could tell. Here we were, in Rome, trying to communicate in a language none of us really knew. Eventually, I gathered that the next bus would take us to where we wanted to go. I’m not sure how the guy managed to help us, but he did. They hopped on the first bus, and he told us to keep waiting.

Sure enough, another bus came along shortly, and we hopped on without tickets. I normally don’t do this sort of thing, but we were without other reasonable options. in short order, we were on the highway, and then crossing the overpass over the river. Soon I saw that we were headed right into the neighborhood of our hotel!

The bus ended up letting us off right in front of our hotel. It was line 771, the same that we’d seen make that stop multiple times. It couldn’t have been a happier ending to our misadventure!

The rundown Sheraton Roma was a welcome sight.

Conclusion

This is one of only a few times I’ve actually felt lost on a trip. It guess not truly lost, as I had a fairly good idea of where we were and where we needed to go. I just didn’t know how to get us back. And I was completely unprepared.

All ended well, though, as we were able to make it back safely and soundly. But next time I will absolutely opt for sticking with what we know, even if it means extra time, and an extra ATM fee.

Our Whirlwind 44 Hours in Luxembourg

After three days in the City of Lights (Day 1, Day 2, Day 3), we hopped on a train across the French hills to the tiny country of Luxembourg. I’d wanted to add a second destination to our trip, and it made sense, given that Paris is just a few hours away. Alternatively, we could have done another location in France, or possibly Belgium. But given the brevity of the trip, Luxembourg made the most sense.

I also have a fascination with tiny countries. When my wife and I toured southern France, Italy and Ireland in 2016, we also spent a couple nights in the tiny country of San Marino. Landlocked within Italy, it is a city-state with a fascinating history (SEE: 5 Reasons to Visit San Marino). We also visited Monaco on that trip, another tiny country (SEE: Hiking Monaco to La Turbie). Luxembourg was a good fit, and totally doable in a day and a half.

Hotel on a hill

We arrived in The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg (as it is officially known) in the late afternoon at the main train station. I’d asked the hotel if they have a shuttle that would be able to pick us up. Unfortunately, they don’t , but the staff member who responded to me gave me instructions on how to get there by bus. Turned out to be super easy. We had to make one transfer at the Badanstalt stop.

We were staying at the DoubleTree, which is located outside the central part of town (SEE: DoubleTree Luxembourg Review). The bus didn’t run all the way to the hotel, so we did have to walk a few hundred yards up the hill.

The kids were fairly tired by this point in the trip. We’d spent three days seeing Paris, plus another couple hours in Luxembourg Gardens that morning before heading off to the train station. Our evening would best be spent in the pool, which was fine by them. We also made a couple calls back home, one to mom and their brother, and one to my daughter’s friend.

The one downside of not venturing out was that we had to eat in the hotel, which ended up being stupidly expensive. Not to mention the food was sub-par. But everything got better from there.

An enchanting morning

I’d told the kids the night before that I’d probably be up early to take a walk. They both said they wanted to go, but I knew that 6:00 a.m. was going to come too soon for them. Plus, I did want them to sleep in a bit and get a good night’s rest. I’m sure I could slip out and in before they even woke up.

The next morning was lovely. I left the kids sleeping peacefully in the hotel room and started down the hill. I traced the route the bus had taken from the City center, only departing once I got down near the creek in the bottom of the valley.

There was a light fog over the landscape. This, plus the utter quiet, made it a perfect morning indeed.

I wound my way through the trees along a creek that I could hear but really couldn’t see until I passed through the old city wall and came to some homes along the canal in the valley.

I also passed under the Grand Duchess Charlotte Bridge, also simply called the “red bridge”. It was far above, barely visible through the fog. The bridge connects the old upper part of the city with the new section, called Kirchberg. This section of the city is notable for containing multiple European Union institutions.

Further along, I came across an elevator that takes you from the bottom of the valley up to the old city. The topography of Luxembourg makes for some wonderful views, but it can make foot travel a bit challenging in places.

I’d not known there was an elevator at this point, but it was more than welcome. I’d been expecting to have to slowly wind my way out of the valley and up to the old city once I discovered a route. This made things far, far easier. It was just a couple more minutes before I strolled past the Badanstalt bus stop where we’d transferred the day before and made my way into the old city.

The old city wasn’t awake yet when I arrived. I spent some time wandering the streets, enjoying the shops beginning to open at the Places d’Armes and the view across the steep valley to the south.

There is a sign on the cultural center (formerly a palace and government building) that commemorates when Allied troops liberated Luxembourg during the Second World War.

Walking back past the cathedral. I grabbed a coffee at one of the only open cafés. It surprised me that the city was so sleepy, but I guess it was a weekend.

I knew it’d be a hike to get to the old city,  but I’d made good time. But taking the bus back made a whole lot more sense than walking. Luckily, the system is super easy to navigate. I ended up jumping on the first bus that would get me close, rather than waiting another 20 minutes for the one that could take me to Rue Jean Engling near the hotel.

I arrived a little over an hour after I’d left. The kids were right where I’d left them, snoozing peacefully. I’d given them clear instructions the night before on what to do if they woke up to me gone (get dressed for the day, don’t answer the door). Turns out those weren’t even needed. So much for getting up early with dad to take a walk! We’d do enough walking that day, so it was definitely better that they’d not been up and out at dawn.  😉

Old Luxembourg

After a nice (and free) breakfast at the hotel, we headed out to enjoy our one full day in Luxembourg. The Old City is the main area of interest, and that is the first place we headed. It was now mid-morning, and the town was a whole lot more alive than when I’d been there earlier. The kids were feeling alive, too, and wanted to play at the…uh…playground. I actually wouldn’t call it that, but other kids were climbing the poles, and, hey, they wanted to join in.

We wandered the streets for a little bit, visiting the Place d’Armes and cathedral first. Luxembourg Cathedral isn’t quite as impressive as others in Europe that I’ve seen, but it is beautiful nonetheless.

The town was waking up a bit more now. People were enjoying breakfast at many of the cafés. It was a very lovely morning. We wandered to the south edge of the town with a view of the Pont Adolphe, eventually making our way to the Luxembourg City Museum, the first real stop on our itinerary that day.

Luxembourg City Museum

I highly recommend the Luxembourg City Museum. The museum costs only €5 and is free for kids. The city-state has a fascinating history, and the museum will give you  great taste of it. The exhibits take you from the founding of the city on its rocky outcropping through to its place in modern Europe.

My daughter happened to meet a young lady busily spinning wool on a spinning wheel in one corner of the museum. They struck up a conversation while my son and I wandered the two rooms nearby. She then protested when we were going to move on. Long story short, I let her hang out with her newfound friend, and she chatted her ear off the entire time. The lady was a Luxembourger-American who had decided to relocate back to the land of her father after growing up in Seattle.

My son and I enjoyed the rest of the museum, moving slowly through the exhibits from floor to floor. The early section has some cool models showing the expansion of the city through the years.

The massive elevator that takes you between floors was a highlight as well. I’ve never seen one so large. They obviously custom-designed it to fill the space.

Near the end, there was a modern model of Luxembourg City. It was very neat to see where we’d already been. I pointed out a few places we’d be headed the during the rest of our visit.

We spent about 1.5 hours at the museum, although you could probably spend more. It’s not all that large, but there is still a good amount to see and read. Our visit concluded, my son and I returned to the first floor to fetch my daughter, who was still happily chatting with her yarn-spinning friend.

The Grund

Exiting the museum, we slowly made our way down to the Grund, the lower section of Luxembourg City along the river. This involved walking a lovely narrow street down toward the casemates. Along the way are some of the best views of the entire city. You can see part of the upper city in the left background, the Grund in the middle foreground down below, and the modern tall buildings in the distance located in Kirchberg.

We arrived at the casemates, a complex of tunnels used a bomb shelters during World War II. You can tour them for a fee, but I decided to pass up this attraction. My son found a piano and decided to give Silent Night (the one song he knows) a go. I did not expect this, given the public setting!

Continuing downward toward the river, we eventually found ourselves winding back to the middle of the Grund, which was directly below us when we started. Even though we could see exactly where we were headed, we probably walked at least three times the distance to get there. I should have paid more attention to the bus schedule, especially considering how reliable the service is and that the kids are free! At least taking the path meant the kids got to stop for a bit and play in the creek.

There was a small open air event going on at the bridge. We bought crepes for lunch from one of the stalls and hung out by the river for a bit. I thought the kids would enjoy a Nutella crepe, but it turns out that combination wasn’t received well. We hung out for a while with the people and vendors, eventually meandering to the other side of the river and waiting at a bus stop to head back to the middle of Luxembourg City. We took a brief joyride on one of the buses to see a bit more of the city before returning to the hotel for the evening.

But wait, there’s day two!

Our full day exploring Luxembourg City may have been over, but we still had a bit of adventure left before we needed to head back to the airport. Day two began with a lazy morning, as we’d done so much walking the day before. After another great (free) breakfast at the hotel restaurant we moseyed on down to the bus stop, just in time to catch the bus to the city center again. But today we caught a different line at Badanstalt this time, however, one that headed out to the edge of town. The point of interest? The Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial.

There are a number of U.S. cemeteries scattered across Europe in which soldiers from both world wars are buried. I figured we should visit the one in Luxembourg, given that we were so close. The cemetery is a 15 minute walk from the last bus stop, down a quiet road. It is in the flight path of the Luxembourg airport, so we got to do some plane spotting on our way there and then on the way back again.

Because our kids are from Costa Rica, they are almost completely unfamiliar with American history, especially history as it relates to the world wars of the twentieth century. I relayed what I could regarding World War II to both of them as we made our way to the front gate of the cemetery.

Overcome by reverence

I knew the Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial would command a great respect, but I was not anticipating the level of emotion that I experienced when we walked through the gate.

The cemetery is perfectly maintained. There is a memorial chapel in the middle of the stone terrace. Flanking it on either side are two displays of the names of soldiers who were missing in action during the Second World War along with engravings of military operations.

Many of the soldiers buried at the Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial were killed in combat during the Battle of the Bulge, late in the war. It occurred very close to Luxembourg. Down the hillside are row upon row of wooden crosses and Jewish stars for each solider.

At the very top of the hill, closest to the terrace and separate from the other graves is the grave of General George Patton who tragically died just months after the conclusion of the war.

I would highly recommend a visit to the Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial if you are an American visiting this tiny country.

Off to CDG!

The hours passed by so quickly. I felt like we’d barely arrived in Luxembourg, even though we’d spend a solid day and a half exploring. We made a final stop at the Palace of the Grand Duke. They have a guard outside who parades back and forth and switches off with the one in the booth.

We also had a photo op with Grand Duchess Charlotte. She was the monarch of Luxembourg during the Second World War, but abdicated in 1965 and was succeeded by her son. The “red bridge” mentioned earlier is named in honor of her.

All too soon we had to head back to the hotel, fetch our bags, and return to the train station. The rest of the day was spent making our way back to Charles de Gaulle airport for our flight back to the U.S. the following morning (SEE: Air France A380 economy review: Paris to San Francisco).

I’d say things went smoothly, but I’d be lying. We had a little incident where I got lost in Metz in our rental car. But that is a story for a different day. Our final night was at the Holiday Inn Express Charles de Gaulle (SEE: Paris Holiday Inn Express CDG Airport Review), which ended up being a great airport hotel pick.

Luxembourg in 10 Photos

As I wrap up writing about our day and a half in this tiny country, I figured I’d let the highlights speak for themselves. Without words, that is. Enjoy.

3 Days in Paris: Day 3 – Savoring the City

After dragging ourselves through the exhaustion of our first day in the City of Light (SEE: 3 Days in Paris: Day 1 – Surviving the Jetlag), followed by a very full day of seeing the main sights (SEE: 3 Days in Paris: Day 2 – Hitting the Highlights), some extra sleep was called for to start off our third day.

Once the kids were up and ready, we had breakfast at Aux Péchés Normands for the third time. It was already becoming tradition. The little bakery is a two minute walk from our hotel and offers great pastries, plus fresh coffee and juice. Fueled for the morning, we headed back toward where we’d began our adventures two days ago.

Notre Dame de nouveau

Notre Dame cathedral was both the first and last stop on our first day in the city. We’d enjoyed the view of the famous church from the square in front, returning later to enjoy the view from the towers.

But we’d missed one important piece: seeing the inside of the cathedral. This was what we intended to rectify today.

We arrived at Place Jean-Paul II to what seemed like an enormous line in front of Notre Dame. It extended the length of the square, and then wrapped around back towards the front of the Gothic cathedral. There really wasn’t any alternative to get inside, so we just joined the lengthy queue.

The line moved surprisingly quickly, and we were actually inside in under 10 minutes. The inside of Our Lady of Paris is just as lovely as her exterior. I love wandering around old cathedrals. When my wife and I visited Europe in 2016, we went to cathedrals in Milan, Florence and Dublin.

We didn’t stay especially long, just enough to take in the stained glass and immense feel of the cathedral. From Notre Dame we moved on to the other sights located on the Île de la Cité.

Conciergerie and Saint-Chappelle

A short walk later and we were standing at the entrance to Saint-Chappelle, a beautiful chapel with some of the most impressive stained glass I have ever seen. The chapel isn’t very large, but the ceilings are high and the color is mesmerizing.

Sainte-Chappelle is part of the Palais de la Cité, the residence of the kings of France for centuries. In many ways it is equally as impressive as Notre Dame.

The kids and I enjoyed the stained glass and wandering both the upper and lower levels of Sainte-Chappelle before moving on to the Conciergerie, located just another short walk away.

The Conciergerie is another part of the royal palace on the island in the middle of the Seine, albeit an infamous part of it. It served a number of functions after the French kings moved to the palace across the river, before becoming an infamous part of the French Revolution. Many prisoners were held here before being executed by guillotine, including Marie Antoinette.

I was surprised by how bare the interior is kept. There were a few areas where you could read about the history of the building, but other than that, you just got to wander the bare stone rooms. Bare, that is, except for a flume that is oddly constructed through the space and results in the waterfall you see outside between the towers.

I did my best to relay my limited knowledge of the French Revolution to the kids. They were fascinated by the story of Marie Antoinette, asking again and again why she was killed. The fact that the revolutionaries killed her unjustly, hating her for her wealth and power as one of the French royals, was hard for them to get their minds around.

Even as we left the Conciergerie, the kids continued to ask about Marie Antoinette and what happened during the revolution. I was glad for the moment I could teach them a small nugget of history, right in the place where it happened.

Lazily cruising the Seine

From the Conciergerie we continued our stroll along the Île de la Cité, heading to the dock where one of the river cruise companies operates. Given how much we’d all been on our feet the previous day, I wanted to make sure we broke up our day a bit more with active versus passive activities. I made sure to plan a time where we could just sit and talk and take in Paris. A cruise on the Seine fit the bill perfectly.

The tour company we used was fine, but there is serious room for improvement. Given the price of Paris in general, I was going for cheap. I’m sure there are better companies out there. The main drawback was that the tour guide did little more than point out 8-10 places in very thickly accented English. I caught most of what she said, but the kids hardly understood anything.

But it was still enjoyable to watch the city drift by from the water. The cruise took us from the Île de la Cité to the Eiffel Tower and back again.

We also headed upriver briefly and passed by Notre Dame, which was a highlight from the water.

We also saw (purportedly) the smallest house in Paris.

It was a great way to kill and hour and still enjoy the city. I’d highly recommended adding a Seine cruise as part of your Paris itinerary.

A much needed rest

Even after sitting for an hour, the kids were still tired. Three days of walking and sightseeing was a lot for both of them. It was mid-afternoon, and I still wanted to take them to Champ de Mars that evening to see the Eiffel Tower again and basically saw our goodbyes to Paris.

The best course of action was to regroup at the hotel for a while. The kids spent some time watching cartoons while I closed my eyes and tried not to drift off to sleep. Which was hard. I don’t like taking down time and would rather stay out until I’m completely done for the day. But with the kids, I needed to break it up.

But we had to get moving soon before I just decided to stay put. Dinner. We needed dinner.

Au revoir, Tour Eiffel

We headed out after maybe an hour at the Crowne Plaza Paris Republique, and grabbed some more bread, cheese and lunchmeat at a local store. Dinner was on the cheap yet again. However, we splurged afterwards, buying eclairs at one of the top-rated bakeries in the city. It was the most utterly delectable cream-filled pastry I’d eaten in my entire life.

On our way to the Champ de Mars, I became concerned that we might get rained out. The weather didn’t look promising. Sure enough, as we exited the train station, a light rain was falling. Plenty of other people had umbrellas. We weren’t so prepared. Even living in Humboldt, I cannot remember the last time I used an umbrella out and about.

We decided to just make a go of it. Looking at the clouds, I didn’t expect the rain to get worse, and it certainly wasn’t cold. We would be fine. This turned out to be the right call, as the rain let up within 15 minutes.

We walked along the Champ de Mars, bidding the icon of Paris adieu. Just had to get the perfect photo of these two in front of it. We strolled along slowly, me taking it all in. The kids brought up the fact that I’d made them walk up hundreds of stairs to the top. I have no regrets of my decision.

On the other side of the tower we encountered “the bubble man”. He was in the business of providing enjoyment to at least a dozen kids at a time for a small sum from their parents’ pocket (voluntary, of course). The kids enjoyed jumping and chasing the bubbles immensely. The Eiffel Tower made for the perfect backdrop.

A carousel ride, the perfect Parisian ending

After that we crossed the Seine toward Trocadero once more. This time we weren’t in a hurry, having already accomplished the mission of the evening. The kids asked to ride the carousel, and I figured this was the last chance we’d have. Of course this one picked a plane instead of a horse.

From there we wandered over to a small park maybe 100 yards from the Trocadero fountains. To my surprise, there were a couple families with kids. Young kids. I’m always taken aback by how late Europeans are out each evening. It was definitely late for us. The kids should have already been in bed. But here we were, enjoying the park, as the hour hand crept past 9 o’clock.

We finally got back to the hotel around 10:00, and quickly to bed. We said goodbye to Paris the following day, which was bittersweet. A final visit to Luxembourg Gardens was all we were able to fit in. We’d had a ton of fun. But the adventure would continue in Luxembourg!

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