My wife and I had the privilege of visiting the Eternal City for a week in summer 2016 as part of a month-long excursion to Europe that included touring Italy, France, and Ireland. Oh, and San Marino (SEE: 5 reasons to visit San Marino). How could I forget that?!

While doing my research for Rome, I came across two sightseeing pass options: the Roma Pass and the Omnia Pass. The question is…which is better? Are either worth it? Let’s take a look.

Roma Pass details

The Roma Pass comes in two flavors: the 48-hour and the 72-hour. Both give unlimited free access to ATAC, the public transportation system of Rome, during the time they are active. The Roma Pass also gives significant discounts to dozens of exhibitions, events and businesses.

The main differences between the two versions are the cost and how many museums you get into for free:

  • 48-hour Roma Pass – Free entry into your first museum or archaeological site – Cost of €28
  • 72-hour Roma Pass – Free entry into first two museums or archaeological sites – Cost of €38.50

You can find the list of museums here. We used ours to enter the Colosseum/Forum and the Capitoline Museum, a value of €12 and €15, respectively.

When visiting the Coliseum, the Capitoline Museum, and the Castel Sant’Angelo, you do not have to wait in the ticket line if you hold a Roma Pass (as long as this is one of your free sites where you get this access). This can be a significant benefit, as ticket lines can be long in peak summer season. The longest lines we observed were at the Coliseum.

The typical Rome ATAC 48-hour transit pass included with the Roma Pass normally costs €12.50. A 72-hour transit pass normally costs €18. The ATAC transportation network does include buses to Ciampino airport, but there are other options to make this trip as well (SEE: Best way to get from Rome City Center to Ciampino Airport). Neither pass covers transportation to/from Fiumicino.

Grafitti everywhere. All the metro cars are decorated.

The card is valid from the first time it is activated, either during a visit to a sit or when used on public transportation. Your pass will require you to put your name on it when you purchase it, and you may be asked for proof of identity.

The Roma Pass doesn’t offer entry or discounts on anything related to the Vatican City, which has its own sort of pass: the Omnia Pass.

roma pass vs omnia pass

Omnia Pass Details

The Omnia Pass is a different animal entirely. It includes the same coverage as the Roma Pass, but with some additions. The price is also substantially higher at €113  for adults and €80 for children (although the passes sometimes goes on sale).

The Omnia Pass includes:

  • Free entry to 2 top Rome attractions out of a list of 6, including: the Colosseum/Forum, Capitoline Museum, Castel Sant’Angelo, and Borghese Gallery
  • Free Admission to the Vatican Museums and Sistine Chapel
  • Fast Track entry to the Vatican sites
  • Free hop on-hop off bus tour of Rome
  • 72-hour ATAC card
  • Discounted entry to other sites

The value of the Rome attractions is directly comparable to what is offered by the Roma Pass, as the Omnia Pass literally includes a Roma Pass as part of the pack.

Free admission to the Vatican Museums and Sistine Chapel with the Omnia Pass is a savings of €17. The “skip the line” tickets that you can buy online cost the entry fee plus a €4 processing fee (per order). You do have to pick a date and time when buying your ticket, while I believe you can go at your leisure with the Omnia Pass.

The fast-track entry to the Vatican Museums and Sistine Chapel may be something you definitely want during peak times. The lines for the Vatican Museums are insane. What I don’t know is if there is a separate line for Omnia Pass holders, as we stood in a pretty long line even after purchasing tickets online.

You also get fast-track entry to St. Peter’s Basilica with the Omnia Pass. There is no entrance fee to visit the church, but visiting the dome costs €6-8. With the Omnia Pass, you get a free Audio Guide and fast track entry (typical value of €15).

The 72-hour hop on-hop off bus tour has a value of €32 based on a review of the Roma Cristiana website. You can also buy a combo bus tour plus public transportation ticket for €39. Since the Omnia Pass includes public transportation with the Roma Pass, this is more or less the value that should be used for both of those.

Roma Pass vs Omnia Pass: which is better?

The value of the Roma Pass is rather easy to determine. We found the 72-hour pass to be a good deal. Simply accounting for the two museums we visited (€12 and €15) and 3 days of free ATAC transportation (€18), we each saved €6.50 by purchasing the pass. Not incredible savings, but it did also save us the wait in the long lines at the Colosseum. And that’s the most basic usage of the pass.

Beyond that, you get reduced rate tickets at other sites. My wife and I visited Castel Sant’Angelo as well using the Roma Pass, and the ticket price was €7 instead of the full €14. If you plan to visit several of the sites on the list within just a few days, you’ll definitely get great value out of the Roma Pass.

The Omnia Pass is a pricier alternative that offers more in one pass, but really doesn’t offer an appreciable discount. The “value” quoted is €118.50 for a typical Rome tourist. They are trying to sell you this pass for €113. A 5% discount isn’t anything to write home about.

What irks me most is that the Omnia Pass website actually lies to you. I don’t understand how they get the €30 valuation of the Vatican Museums and Sistine Chapel ticket (I see it online for €17 + processing fee). They are basically selling you everything bundled together for maybe market price, if not a hair more.

Here’s how I add up everything up for the Omnia Pass: €39 for bus tour plus ATAC card, €27 for the two Roma Pass Museums, €15 for the Vatican fast track and audio guide, and €21 for the Vatican Museum tickets plus processing fee. Total value of €102. Typical Omnia Pass price is €113. It falls short for the basic user. You’d really have to maximize the value at other museums (with your included Roma Pass) to maximize the value.

If you aren’t interested in a hop-on, hop-off bus tour, the Omnia Pass definitely isn’t for you. You’d be looking at a major loss.

Comparing the Roma Pass vs Omnia Pass, we concluded that the Roma Pass is better. It is cheaper and offers tangible savings, while the Omnia Pass is pricey and is much hard to maximize. This was true when I looked up the pricing for our trip to Rome two years ago, and it is still true today. Unless I’m missing something, they are really suckering most people with the Omnia pass.

Conclusion

In my opinion, the Roma Pass is solidly the better deal. The Omnia Pass may be an okay deal in a small minority of cases, but I would venture to guess that it wouldn’t meet the needs of the typical Rome visitor. If the Omnia Pass cost €20 less, my mind might be changed. But it’s simply too expensive to be a deal.

When you pit the Roma Pass vs Omnia Pass, the Roma Pass is definitely the clear winner.