Points, Miles & Life

Travel adventures on this earthly pilgrimage

Category: Airports (page 1 of 3)

Best way to get from CDG Airport to Paris

When researching destinations, the first thing on my mind is how to get to and from the airport. For Paris, the main airport is Charles de Gaulle (CDG). It is the hub of Air France, and is primarily used by the major/full-service carriers. This is where we were flying into, so I wanted to find was the best way to get from CDG airport to Paris.

Luckily, there are a number of options. Some may appeal more to the cash-strapped backpacker, while other may be better for the time-sensitive business traveler.

Which makes it a bit hard to determine the best way to get from CDG airport to Paris center. But we’ll try. Here are four options:

Convenient: RER B Train

One convenient option is the RER B train that departs regularly from CDG. Expect to wait 10-15 minutes for a departure. The cost is 10.30€ per person (7€ for kids 4-9), and you can use the ticket machines to purchase your fare by card. The machines do have English as a language option. For myself and the kids, we paid 27.60€ for our transportation from CDG to Paris.

best way to get from cdg airport to paris

The RER B takes about 30 minutes from CDG airport and will take you to Gare du Nord as the first major stop. Additional stops include Saint-Michel Notre-Dame, Luxembourg Gardens, and Port Royal, among others.

The train does make local stops along the way to the center of Paris. At least ours did. I don’t know if this is standard. Maybe only some do this and we ended up on a local train.

From each of the stops, you can catch at least one metro line to other destinations within Paris. This is what we did, catching line 5 to Republique from Gare du Nord. You must have your train ticket to exit the train.

One detail I missed is that you can apparently use your RER B ticket to transfer to the metro for free. I wasn’t aware of this. We bought three metro tickets needlessly.

Roissybus

This was my backup option if I decided not to take the train. We were originally going to be staying at the Holiday Inn Paris Opera and Grands Boulevards, and using the bus would make more sense as it takes you to the Opera neighborhood.

If you want to take the Roissybus, you can buy a ticket at the bus station at CDG. The cost is €12. Busese run about every 20 minutes.

The transit time of the bus varies based on traffic. Generally, it will probably take 45 minutes to an hour to get you from CDG to Paris. Because we weren’t staying in the Opera area, the bus didn’t make much sense, as it is both more expensive and takes longer than the train.

Shared Van

A shared van could possibly save you a bit of transit time, but with some added cost. It won’t be as expensive as a taxi or Uber, however, since they are transporting multiple people. The plus side is that you will be taken to your actual destination and won’t need to transfer anywhere.

Prices vary depending on your destination. Transit between our hotel (Crowne Plaza Paris Republique) and the airport with Super Shuttle prices at €47 each way for three people. This is definitely more than the train, but it isn’t outrageous.

You can schedule your pick up and drop off ahead of time and pay ahead of time as well, which is convenient.

Potentially fastest: Uber/Taxi

If time is your most critical factor, Uber or a Taxi may be the way to go. Just expect to pay a whole lot more than for the train or bus. However, if you are traveling as a family, the cost differential might not end up being quite as bad.

A taxi or Uber can get you to the Paris city center in ~40 minutes, but it obviously depends where in Paris you are staying. The benefit here is that you will be taken directly to your destination rather than to a station from where you have to take a city bus or metro to your final destination.

But it comes at a cost. Uber will probably cost upwards of €50, and I’d expect a taxi to cost even more. Might be worth it if you’re traveling as a group and can pile several people into a car.

Personally, I don’t value the time savings that highly. I’d rather stick with the train, which in my opinion is generally the best way to get from CDG airport to Paris after reviewing all the options.

Conclusion

At the end of the day, it really depends on your needs to determine the best way to get from CDG Airport to Paris. The train is probably the most consistent and economical for the majority of folks. I’d maybe consider a rideshare if in a group, but I probably wouldn’t consider the other options, mainly due to cost.

Roissybus photo used under CC 2.0 license

San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront Executive Studio Suite Review

Pros: Fantastic location, beautiful lobby, great loyalty recognition, room had an awesome airport view

Cons: Lounge wasn’t serviced well in the evening

Our final night before we called off our original trip to Europe (which was subsequently re-planned) was at the San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront. I wanted to be in close proximity to the airport for our flight out the next day, and it was a great option. It would also be the final night for finishing off my Marriott Platinum challenge (SEE: Fast track status: how to sign up for a Marriott Platinum challenge).

Arrival at the San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront

We didn’t have to travel far to the hotel since we’d been staying in SF for free the previous two nights. There were a couple reasons I wanted to be in a hotel that night. First, I needed to be able to clean the apartment, launder the linens and towels, and tidy up in general, and I didn’t want to rush through all that during our last morning. Second, I wanted the kids to be able to enjoy themselves after two days of being cooped up with just their math books, activity books, a few toys and a couple movies while I was in all-day work meetings. I knew that a swim in the pool would make their day. Plus, I was still split on whether we’d actually head out on the trip and I wanted them to enjoy some part of our excursion to San Francisco.

The most cost-effective option to get to the hotel was (amazingly) Uber from the city. We paid right about ~$30 to get to the airport hotel. BART to the airport would have cost us a hair more, and then we would have had to walk through the terminal and take the airport shuttle. After thanking the Uber driving we walked inside to a beautiful lobby with a great view of the Bay.

san francisco airport marriott waterfront lobby

There was no check-in line when we arrived at the San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront. I had decided not to check-in early with the Marriott app, hoping to ask for an upgrade to at least a bay view room from which we could watch the planes land. The agent at the front desk said that wouldn’t be a problem and soon we were on our way to the 10th floor with our room keys.

Sweet first impressions

The agent failed to tell me that he had gone beyond just an upgrade to a bay view room; we were given a corner executive suite with a stunning view of both the airport and runways! My kids were thrilled. To date this is the best Marriott upgrade we’d been given, and I didn’t even hold Platinum status (although I do now).

The suite had two queens beds in the bedroom area, which was separated from the living area by a doorway.

The living area for its part was furnished sufficiently, with a couch, armchair and a table and chairs for four.

san francisco airport marriott waterfront suite living space

The best part of all was the view, of course. I’ve already touched on that. Watching planes coming and going at SFO from the comfort of our room was awesome. You can sit and eat (or work) and catch every wide-body that touches down at SFO.

The room had the other typical amenities, like a desk and TV.

Oddly, there wasn’t a second TV in the living area.

Most suites I’ve ever been given have more than one TV if the bedroom and living areas are separate (or a creative solution like this Hyatt House hotel). But this is a small concern to me. We hardly ever turn it on anyway.

I don’t know the occupancy of the suite, but it would have been sufficient for our family of five. With a couch, a table and chairs, a desk and plenty of space, it is ideal for a family. The primary difficulty would be guaranteeing that you get the room, short of paying the $350 the San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront was asking that night.

Bathroom

The bathroom was the only awkward part of the room. For starters, the door didn’t lock. This really isn’t an issue if you’re traveling as a couple. But with two of my kids, it could have been a bit awkward. Luckily, the toddler wasn’t along to pull it open on me.

The suite had only a glass shower, which was fine. I actually prefer this. But note that there isn’t a tub, in case that is a necessary amenity for you.

I never really care what the branding is of the bathroom amenities as long as they give you some. The only ones that ever really wowed me were at the Park Hyatt Milan.

M Lounge at the San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront

Since I have Marriott Gold status, we were granted complimentary access to the M Lounge. Typically, lounges offer a light breakfast in the morning and snacks in the evening, plus some other amenities. The M Lounge offered a good amount of seating.

We arrived a little late, and there wasn’t much to be found in the lounge. They had a few canisters of snacks, consisting of gummies, M&Ms and Chex mix. Not really anything you could even being to call dinner. I prefer when places will at least have crackers, veggies and other light fare that you can eat enough to say you had dinner.

Well…the options here were let the kids eat snack food or go pay for dinner at the hotel restaurant. I did what any dad would do when mom is not around and let the kids eat Chex mix and gummies for dinner. We fortunately also found some yogurt, which ended up being the main staple. I’m sure it was in the cooler as part of breakfast, but I still considered it fair game. Our other choices were milk, butter and a single type of soft drink.

The lounge space itself was nice enough. The one problem was that people continued to come through, and no one was there to either clean or restock any of the snacks.

Finally, just when we were about to leave, an employee came by with more of everything to refill the canisters.

Breakfast

Breakfast in the morning was a bit better in the M Lounge. Selections included eggs and bacon, fruit, yogurt and other items. The selection wasn’t huge, but we found it sufficient.

The one downside was that the place was a zoo. This is the one reason I didn’t take any photos during breakfast. It always feels awkward to me trying to take photos at a hotel or lounge buffet with people all around me.

Alternatively, you could eat in the hotel restaurant. But free food at the lounge with Marriott elite status is a perk. I’m not going to turn it down.

Swimming Pool

If your kids are anything like mine, the most important amenity of a hotel is the pool. We definitely made time for a morning swim.

The pool at the San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront isn’t very large. But it’s nice enough. There is also a sizable hot tub.

The plus was that we had the pool to ourselves when we visited. We stayed about an hour before heading back up to our awesome suite to watch some more airplanes.

An avgeek paradise

The San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront sits to the south of SFO with enviable views of the airport, runways and bay. It’s in an ideal location for an aviation geek. If you decide to visit, make sure to book a room with a Bay View and/or ask for an upgrade at the desk. The view of the airport is really the hotel’s best feature.

We were in a corner suite on the airport side, so our views not only included runways 28L and 28R, but San Francisco Airport itself. We could watch jets land and take off at our leisure.

Given the dirty state of the windows, the photos aren’t the best.

san francisco airport marriott waterfront view

You could probably get some great shots from the waterfront walk along the Bay in front of the hotel, which is another great spot to hang out. How I wished I had a decent camera to take some photos of the airplane landing action on 28L and 28R.

Final remarks

The San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront is now in the running for best SFO airport hotel. The other one I’m really partial to is the Staybridge Suites San Bruno, where we burnt our IHG free night certificates last year (SEE: Why the “best value” redemptions might not actually provide the best value).  The benefit of Staybridge is that they offer a full breakfast and a better evening reception that can double as dinner. I wasn’t impress with what the M Lounge had to offer.

san francisco airport marriott waterfront dusk view

Still, the San Francisco Airport Marriott Waterfront has a lot going for it, especially given its amazing location near SFO Airport and its runways. For those with a love of airplanes, I’d highly recommend the hotel. Elite recognition was also good, given that we were upgraded to a suite without top-tier Marriott status. I’d happily stay here again.

My Kids Magically Fixed United

Let’s face it…traveling anywhere when you live on the beautiful California Redwood Coast is a chore. I have a love/hate relationship flying out of the Arcata airport. The convenience cannot be understated. But that is when things go smoothly. When things go wrong, and they go wrong far too often, it can be a major pain in the neck (SEE: My Second United Horror Story).

Lately I’ve taken to booking out of a bigger airport if time is of the essence, typically if I am flying across the country for work. But for our recent trip to the Southwest, convenience won.

Flying out of Arcata Airport worth the deal

For our trip to the Southwest, I booked last minute tickets for a steal: $91 and 22,500 Avianca LifeMiles for all three of us. The beauty of this plan was that we got to fly out of Arcata. The nerve-wracking part of the plan was also that we were flying out of Arcata.

Over a total of about 15 flights that I’ve flown in or out of Arcata, no fewer than 3 have been canceled. A solid 20% cancellation rate. That’s horrible. Delays or cancellation have thrown a wrench in our plans enough times that I literally prefer driving to the Bay to fly most places these days.

Given this experience, there was a bit of trepidation as our trip approached.

Wait…this was an Arcata flight, right?

I kept my eye on the United app during the day of our planned departure. The previous legs serviced by our aircraft were on time, so things were looking good. Our plane landed at the Arcata Airport right on time while we were still driving north. It looked like everything would go smoothly. And there was no fog to stop us this time (SEE: My Second United horror story)!

Boarding was quick in Arcata, as the plane was barely half full. Amazingly, there wasn’t any message from the captain stating the SFO tower had requested we stay on the ground. Too often they don’t have a spot for us and the flight gets delayed until SFO air traffic control can slip our landing into the incoming traffic. This time we were off the ground well ahead of schedule.

Maybe it was because we’d taken off “backwards”. On all other flights in or out of Arcata, the everything is operated off of Runway 32. This time we took off in the opposite direction, from Runway 14. This allowed me to get the shot of the airport as we circled around to the west.

Besides a little turbulence, the flight was fantastic. We were even in economy plus, and I had two seats to myself, so there was room to spare. These ERJ-175s are a much better ride than the tiny CRJs. I couldn’t believe it when we arrived in San Francisco a ridiculous 29 minutes early.

This has never happened on any flight I’ve taken out of Arcata. I’m pleased if we are even remotely on time. Had we really just flown the same little route that is so constantly plagued by delays???

I told the kids this was the best flight I’d ever taken out of Arcata. They didn’t seem to care in the slightest. Figures their first time flying outta here would go more smoothly than I’ve ever experienced.

Being treated like we’re in first class

To top things off, the service was ten times better than it’s ever been. While the flight attendants pretty much never offer drinks on the short hop to the Bay, they do bring by snacks. The offering consisted of only pretzels…unless you were my kids. The flight attendant offered them the last two stroopwafels from the morning. Lucky ducks. All they did was munch snacks and stare out the windows.

Then near the end of the flight the first-class flight attendant brought me two more snacks: Oreos and gummy bears. Do kids hardly fly? Or do the Skywest FAs single them out for special treatment? I’ve never really observed either. It’s like they knew we try to limit our kids sugar intake and were working against us.

To top it off, the flight attendant on the plane to Tucson handed me an small bag of Haribo gummy bears for the kids. I didn’t even know they had these on the plane! Or maybe they were her own. I have no clue. I just know people kept handing me candy for the kids, our flights were empty, and far more ahead of schedule than I’ve ever seen them. If this is the new United Airlines experience, sign me up every time.

Conclusion

I’m not sure what happened to the old United Airlines I’ve come to love endure, but this was definitely my best flight ever out of Arcata. And a great start to our week-long road trip.

Centurion Lounge Las Vegas Review

Work sent me to Las Vegas for a couple days right at the end of 2017. Well, I actually was headed to Needles, California, but I had to fly into Las Vegas and drive the 2 hours south. Which was an adventure (nightmare?) in itself. When I headed home, I decided to check out the Centurion Lounge Las Vegas.

I have been to the Centurion Lounge SFO (SEE: Centurion Lounge SFO Review) several times and the Centurion Studio SeaTac once. While not the primary reason I picked up a Business Platinum Card from American Express (it was during the 100,000 MR bonus offer), the lounge access it provides has come in handy this year, most recently in Oakland (SEE: Escape Lounge Oakland review). I honestly didn’t expect to visit a Centurion Lounge after I won my first access from a Mommy Points giveaway, but I ended up getting the card the next month. Ironically, I’m probably going to drop it soon.

Arriving at the Centurion Lounge Las Vegas

The Centurion Lounge Las Vegas McCarran is located in Terminal 3. I dropped my rental car, quickly passed through security, and was on the tram under to the terminal in no time. Once in Terminal 3, you take the escalators up and turn left to head to the Centurion Lounge Las Vegas.

The front of the lounge is a bit more nondescript than the glass entry, greenery and vertical sign at SFO. I honestly almost missed it.

The lady at the front desk was friendly and professional, and she welcomed me as a first-timer to the Las Vegas location after asking whether I had visited previously. She provided a brief description of the facilities and services provided.

The space

The Centurion Lounge Las Vegas feels a bit larger than its counterpart in SFO. The space has similar seating, with some of the same pods and benches featured. I can imagine that all Centurion Lounges likely use the same style furniture.

A long wall separates the bar, food, and main dining area from much of the rest of the lounge. Facing the windows on the other side, the wall has several seating alcoves. I chose one of these initially to work from for a while.

centurion lounge las vegas

At the end there is a variety of seating. This also seemed like the quietest part of the lounge, as foot traffic is lessened. Had there been any open seats, I would have chosen to sit here.

There is a kids room at the Centurion Lounge Las Vegas, just like in San Francisco. It is a bit bigger. If only American Express hadn’t changed their entry policy and completely hosed families with more than one kid (SEE: American Express devalues lounge access, sticks it to families). Sigh.

Food at the Centurion Lounge Las Vegas

I didn’t bother checking out what the offerings were for breakfast. As I’d arrived at 10:00, it was still running. Instead, I simply got a coffee and sat down to write for a while.

The food changed after 11:00 to the lunch offerings. I eventually joined the line to grab myself a plate.

There was a decent salad selection that included peppers, carrots, cucumbers, cheese, and other items.

There was some ginger rice that I enjoyed. It was probably the best thing offered. There was also a sweet pea puree that I wasn’t keen on.

The meat offering was salmon. I found it mediocre. Definitely not full of flavor.

At the end was udon soup, which I didn’t try.

On the whole, the food at the Centurion Lounge Las Vegas wasn’t quite as good as what I’ve had at SFO. It was a decent lunch, but nothing stood out to me.

Per usual, I didn’t try anything at the bar. I’m sure it had a good selection of alcoholic beverages.

Overall experience

I was happy with the seating, food, and experience overall. The WiFi caused me some issues a few times, but I the root cause might have been my own computer. Each time it would cut out for about 3 minutes, before finally coming back. I would turn my WiFi on and off a few times until it would finally reconnect.

The lounge was fairly crowded when I arrived, and it got an even bit more so as lunchtime approached. I had not expected this, but it rivaled the insanity of the Centurion SFO for a while.

When I got up to go to the bathroom, my seat was occupied when I returned (since I took all my stuff with me), and I had trouble finding another. Things got better after 1:00 p.m. and then even kinda quiet by 2:30.

The line for the food around noon was definitely a turn off. I watched and waited for a good 15 minutes before getting up to grab something to eat.

Conclusion

The ability to grab lunch, sit somewhere quiet and comfortable, and be productive for a few hours in the Centurion Lounge Las Vegas was invaluable. It is also nice to have access to better WiFi (except for a few blips) and cleaner bathrooms than in the terminal. Nothing stood out to me as “above and beyond”, but the lounge is still definitely a step up from the typical United Club or Delta SkyClub.

Santa Rosa Airport Expands to Meet Crushing Demand

Unlike our local Arcata-Eureka Airport, passenger demand at Charles M. Schulz Airport has seen an huge increase over the past several years. Which has been met by a noticeable increase in both flights and airlines serving the small airport.

What hasn’t changed much is the size of the airport. And it needs to. Badly.

Expansion plans have to be altered

Currently, Santa Rosa/Sonoma County Airport is way too small for the number of passenger passing through on a daily basis. Contrary to the loss of service that has been experienced by many airports, Sonoma County has seen strong and steady growth. Numbers jumped this year as more airlines added service after the airport’s $55 million runway expansion project was completed. The airport is poised to see at least a 20% jump in passenger numbers in 2017.

This unprecedented increase has prompted changes to the plans that were initially proposed for the STS expansion. The plans had to be redrawn to deal with both the influx of new service and more passengers. A temporary tent structure will accommodate the crush of passengers until the terminal expansion is completed. Financing for the new expansion project was approved by the County supervisors in September.

STS is a great option for Humboldt travelers

Santa Rosa isn’t all that far away in the scheme of things. Given that the Willits bypass is now in place, you can typically make it nonstop from the Eel Valley to Sonoma County Airport in about 3.5 hours. Sure, it’s a lot longer than the 45 minute trek to ACV. But there are definitely benefits.

First, fares are *much* cheaper. If you’re a family of 4 looking to travel to D.C., you could save upwards of $300 per ticket versus flying out of ACV. Sure, you might save even more flying out of SFO, but you’d be adding another 90 minutes to your drive and more in parking fees. Not to mention generally more in hotel if you’re planning to stay the night.

Second, you have options. Charles M. Shulz Airport is served by Alaska, American, Sun Country, and United. It used to be served by Allegiant on a couple routes. Now that United flies the shortest flight in the U.S. to SFO, a huge United hub, Santa Rosa Airport really is a gateway to the world. You can connect to many destinations across the country and across the globe with only one stop.

Conclusion

I’ll definitely admit that I didn’t like my last experience flying out of STS, and things may be painful in the interim as the airport goes through it’s planned expansion. But looking ahead, I’d say that Sonoma County is an great option for people flying out of northern California.

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