Points, Miles & Life

Travel adventures on this earthly pilgrimage

Category: Airlines (page 1 of 9)

West Coast Magic with Alaska Miles: A Primer

One of my favorite things in this hobby is figuring out how to maximize my miles. Earning miles via credit cards is easy enough, but they are only as valuable as you make them.

Alaska MileagePlan is one of my favorite award programs. Back in late 2016, they rolled out new distance-based awards, both reducing the price on many awards and raising the “cap” on others in high demand. The new awards are called a hop, skip, jump, and leap, based on the distance traveled. Here’s the chart:

Overall, I think consumers came out slightly ahead. Especially if they know how to maximize Alaska’s award routing rules. Here are some great options to explore with your Alaska miles:

Scenario 1: The one-way “round-trip”

One of the most unique things about Alaska Airlines award tickets is that they offer a stopover on a one-way award. Granted, the stopover has to be in one of their hubs, or a hub of a partner. I’ve found a few awards that break this rule, but it generally holds true.

However, if you’re interested in traveling to one of their hubs (think Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles, and Anchorage), you can often use this to your advantage.

Consider for a second that you want to visit Seattle from the Silicon Valley. At a distance of 696 miles from San Jose, a one-way flight *barely* qualifies for the lowest level Alaska award of 5,000 miles. But you can actually book a “round-trip” on a one-way ticket, if you’re willing to get creative.

Instead of booking a round-trip award to and from San Jose for a total of 10,000 miles, use the multi-search tool to add a different, but (sorta) close return airport, say Reno, Nevada. Looks like you even get to fly through Boise, for a total flight distance of 1,696 flown miles.

You’d expect this ticket to price out at 10,000 miles, given the flight distance. But it turns out Alaska prices award tickets on their own metal simply by distance between origin and destination! Because Reno and SJC are much less than 700 miles apart, this award will price out a 5,000 miles at the lowest level!

Now you just have to get yourself home to San Jose from Reno.  You could easily catch a cheap flight back, or maybe take Amtrak.

Sure, this may not be a desirable trip for many people, but what if you wanted to see Tahoe for a bit before heading back to the Bay? It could be just the ticket for you. You’re only looking at 5,000 miles and $70 for a two-stop vacation!

I’m mainly using this example as an illustration, although my wife and I did fly a “one-way” award from Arcata to the Bay Area, with a convenient stop in Portland to meet up with our in-laws (SEE: The Pacific Northwest Stopover Trick).

Scenario 2: The two-stop hop (aka the “in-laws”)

I’ve definitely had my in-laws in mind when considering some of the potential in the Alaska program. My mother-in-law often visits family in San Diego, typically flying out of the tiny Sonoma County (STS) airport. Since the route is under 700 miles, it prices out at 5,000 Alaska MileagePlan miles one-way.

But what if she and my father-in-law want to visit, say, Seattle for a few days, before heading to sunny southern California?

Utilizing Alaska’s amazing stopover on one-way tickets, you can actually book STS-SEA-SAN as a one-way ticket for the same 5,000 miles!

This is especially crazy given that the SEA-SAN flight distance is 1,050 miles and rings in at 7,500 award miles when booked by itself. Again, Alaska actually prices it based on the STS-SAN distance.

Tack on a cheap one-way, or another 5,000 mile award flight back to STS from San Diego, and you have a two destination vacation for a mere 10,000 miles. Not sure you can beat that.

Like the San Jose to Reno example, all you need to find is a cheap ticket back to Santa Rosa. Or you can burn another 5,000 miles, which will probably be worth it in this case. It’s still 10,000 miles for a two-destination vacation!

Scenario 3: The home “stopover”

Things get even more creative if you live in one of Alaska Airlines’ main hubs. Especially Seattle or Portland. The award routing rules are extremely advantageous.

Consider the scenario where you are taking two vacations in the western U.S. in the next several months. Say, one to San Francisco and the other to Las Vegas.

Instead of booking two round-trip awards, book a one-way for your first leg. Cash tickets for this route are competitive, so they may be the way to go instead.

Next, book your return, but combine it with your outbound to Las Vegas on the same one-way award (use the multi-city search tool). Bingo. Your “stopover” is now your several weeks at home between trips. And it is a crazy cheap 5,000 miles!

Now all you have to do is book your final leg and you’ve saved yourself up to 7,500 Alaska miles, the normal price of a SEA-LAS flight! Maybe later in the year you have a trip to Denver and another to Salt Lake City. You can pull this stunt again!

Scenario 4: Hawaii and a transcon on the same one-way

Let’s take the home stopover one step further. While useful before, this trick becomes even more lucrative if you combine a Hawaii trip with a transcontinental flight. For this example I still have to assume you live in an Alaska hub.

Imagine for a moment that you’re booking an award to Hawaii. If you’re located on the West Coast (I’m assuming you live in Seattle), hopefully you’re considering using British Airways Avios. They are generally the best currency for flying West Coast to Hawaii.

But what if you have a trip planned to the Big Apple a month after your Hawaii trip? Hold those Avios for a moment. Alaska miles will get you further, again with their amazing stopover.

If you plan this right, you can essentially get *both* one-way tickets on the same award, spanning two different trips.

Plan your outbound as a one-way with Avios (12,500 per ticket), and then plan your inbound as a one-way Alaska award for 17,500 MileagePlan miles. Add in a stopover in Seattle that spans your time at home.

Voila. You now have a one-way ticket back home from Hawaii, and then a one-way ticket to NYC, all for the less than a single flight to Hawaii would cost with many other mileage currencies.

Is it an awful red-eye? Yes. But for 17,500 miles, you can’t really complain (I’m sure you can find better flights if you book far in advance). Here’s another:

Honolulu back home to San Jose, before taking off for Alaska on another adventure.

Scenario 5: Rural Alaska

Flying to rural Alaska doesn’t really require any interesting “hacks” per se, but I find it is a fantastic use of Alaska miles. You can head to Barrow to experience 24-hour daylight, or maybe go hiking in Nome.

I mention rural Alaska since cash tickets are often super expensive. Consider this round trip between the Bay Area and Dutch Harbor. You’ll almost certainly spend over $1,000 on a cash ticket, if not closer to $1,500. You can fly the same trip for a mere 25,000 MileagePlan miles round-trip. Consider hanging out in Anchorage for a few days as well with your free stopover.

Frustratingly, there is far less award space available at the lowest level than there was last year. Because Alaska offers variable award pricing, you’ll probably end up paying more like 20,000 miles for the ticket. Still, this can make sense for destinations in rural Alaska that cost a ridiculous amount in cash.

A few issues

Annoyingly, Alaska Airlines still doesn’t recognize Bay Area airports as a “hub” for award routing stopover purposes under most circumstances. Given that the airline has bought Virgin America, I wish they would change this.

The system also knows some airports are co-located. You can’t book a “one-way” ticket from SFO to Oakland with a stop in Portland. Nor can you even return to Sacramento or Santa Rosa from the Bay. MileagePlan would be a gold mine if their system allowed these tickets.

Conclusion

I hope this has been useful in showing you how to unlock the potential of Alaska miles. Overall, the award price changes to the Alaska program have been good, but there are some quirks. Personally, I wish they would price awards on PenAir out of Arcata airport better.

If you’re not interested in domestic travel, there are a number of possibilities for using Alaska miles for some great premium products, like JAL and Cathay Pacific to Asia, and AirFrance and KLM to Europe. Business class awards to India on Emirates are also a decent deal.

Header image courtesy of Frank Kovalcheck under CC 2.0 license

Want to visit Spain? New Airline is Pulling Down Bay Area Fares

IAG, parent company of British Airways, Iberia, and Aer Lingus, recently launched LEVEL, a long-haul low cost carrier to compete with the likes of Norwegian.

With only four destinations initially being offered, we are fortunate that two are on the U.S. West Coast: Oakland (3x per week) and Los Angeles (2x per week). Both routes will be served by A330s.

The new carrier is based in Barcelona, Spain. Flights take off starting June 1st. Like Norwegian, the airline will charge you for each and every extra if you buy the most basic fare.

Fares started at a crazy $149 each way when they first went on sale. The initial frenzy is over, but there are still some decent non-stop fares from Oakland to Barcelona available.

What about other carriers?

I’ve been eyeing LEVEL’s fares since they launched. The airline has already been offering some incredible deals to Barcelona.

Currently,  Star Alliance carriers are attacking LEVEL’s low fares. There are many dates from August through January where you can get a one-stop round-trip for right around $400 with Air Canada, United, Lufthansa, and Swiss!

LEVEL’s fares are currently higher than these, so don’t expect these competitive fares to last long.

If you’ve wanted to visit Spain, this could be your chance!

United cuts an Arcata flight, but switches to larger planes

United airlines has cut service to Arcata airport by one flight per day.  But don’t be too worried about the change. United is switching to operating larger aircraft between here and SFO and will be able to accommodate the same number of passengers per day.

The Star Alliance carrier has been in the process of retiring many of it’s small Canadair CRJ-200 regional jets. This small plane has been one of the primary aircraft United has used on the ACV-SFO route. The carrier is switching to the larger Embraer E175, which seats 76 passengers, compared to 50 on a CRJ-200. United is effectively replacing 3 of its CRJ-200 flights with 2 flights serviced by E-175 aircraft, keeping the number of daily departures the same.

The departure times for afternoon flights has adjusted slightly. Instead of a mid-afternoon departure and a second in the early evening, there will be one departure around 4:00 p.m. moving forward. Most afternoon flights starting in May have a scheduled departure time of 4:20. I want to know if this is a fluke, or some clever person making a gentle nod to the Humboldt subculture.

The two other United flights typically take off around 6:00 a.m. and 11:15 a.m.

Downsides of the change

One negative impact from this change is that there are now only a total of 5 flights in or out of Humboldt County each day. If any of these are delayed or cancelled, more passengers will be affected, and rebooking options will be more limited. Both United and PenAir have very poor on time performances in and out of Arcata Airport, so let’s hope they can improve this moving forward.

It’s a bummer to lose some schedule flexibility, too, with only 3 United flight options now. Hopefully the aircraft swap will mean better operations for the remaining flights. This news also comes on the heels of PenAir cutting a flight per day to Portland.

Personally, my feelings are mixed on the change. My last flight back to Humboldt with United was on an E-175. The plane was much newer and nicer. I was also in shock that we actually boarded via a jetway at SFO. Most of the time you have to walk outside at good ol’ gate 84 to a parked CRJ-200. I happily welcome the new aircraft, but I wish it wasn’t at the cost of a flight per day.

Increased Offer for the United MileagePlus Explorer Card!

Chase has temporarily increased the sign-up offer of the United MileagePlus Explorer Visa to 50,000 miles. The standard offer is 30,000 miles, so this is a significant increase.

The current offer will give you a sign up bonus of 50,000 MileagePlus miles after $3,000 in purchases within the first 3 months your account is open. You can also earn an additional 5,000 miles by adding an authorized user.

The card offers the ability to earn United miles, plus several other great perks, including:

  • Free checked bag on United operated flights (and any itinerary beginning with a United flight, as far as I am aware)
  • Priority boarding (group 2)
  • No foreign transaction fees
  • 2 United Club passes annually
  • 10,000 bonus miles after $25,000 in purchases in a calendar year
  • (Modestly) increased award seat availability reserved for cardholders
  • Primary car rental insurance (a great perk, in my opinion)

The card carries an annual fee of $95, which does NOT appear waived the first year. It typically is with the regular application.

NOTE: If you have opened more than 5 new credit card accounts in the past 24 months, it is *very* unlikely that you will be approved for this card. This is known as Chase’s “5/24 rule”.

Why apply for the United MileagePlus Explorer card?

This is one of the better offers for this card. The sign up bonus is worth two domestic round trip tickets, or you can have one round-trip to Europe with just a small amount of spending (60,000 miles).

The 50,000 mile offer usually comes around at least once per year. Sometimes it is accompanied with an annual fee waiver, which would be a slightly better offer than this one. Still, 2 domestic round trip tickets for $95 is a great deal.

For those local to Humboldt, this is one of the best airline cards you can have, if not the best. United offers the most flights out of Arcata, and the award availability is generally pretty good.

How to apply

The application link is here. However, if you are really interested in the card, I would love it if you would leave a comment, see my Twitter referral link, or send me a note via the Contact Me page to let me send you a referral link. I’ll get a bonus and you’ll get the same offer. 😉

PenAir Reduces Service to Arcata

As stated in a press release from the airline, PenAir is reducing daily service in and out of Arcata-Eureka airport. Currently, there are three daily flights to and from Humboldt, and this will be cut back to only two per day. The service reduction went into effect March 1.

The reasoning behind the change is to “improve on-time performance and completion of flights.” The airline industry has been suffering from a shortage of flight crews, and PenAir finds itself with a shortage of resources for some of its West Coast regional routes.  The airline hopes to provide reliable service to “regain the confidence of the communities we serve.” Klamath Falls also took a cut to its daily service.

This is an unfortunate development. PenAir only recently increased service to three flights per day, adding a late afternoon/evening arrival and departure. Rather than cut the new flight, PenAir has cut its earliest fight from the schedule. The airline only started serving Humboldt in Spring of 2016.

However, the airline remains confident in the market. Personally, I have been happy to have PenAir available as an alternative to United. Award flights on PenAir are available using Alaska miles, and my wife and I flew to Portland on an award ticket back in October. Although the small airline has been plagued with horrible delays, our flight fortunately took off exactly on time.

I hope PenAir is able to improve operations and successfully build upon current service to Humboldt in the future.

H/T: Times Standard

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